Skip to Main Menu Skip to Content

Voice for Farmers

UGA Cooperative Extension's Stanley Culpepper has been selected to serve on the EPA's Science Advisory Board. Photo by Dorothy KozlowskiUGA Cooperative Extension's Stanley Culpepper has been selected to serve on the EPA's Science Advisory Board. Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper is one of 19 scientists recently selected to serve on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Science Advisory Board.

Culpepper will provide advice on matters that impact farming and other agriculture-related industries.

“My goal in helping our amazing farmers feed and clothe the world will not change with this new appointment,” Culpepper said. “In fact, this position will foster an even stronger relationship with the EPA, enhancing our ability to help them in the use of sound science and practical experience when making decisions that impact agriculture.”

He views his appointment as a way to improve the agricultural community’s communication with the EPA, which will “benefit everyone,” he said, and help the EPA better understand potential issues faced by American farmers.

Culpepper joined Extension on the UGA Tifton campus in 1999. During his award-winning career, he has been instrumental in finding ways to combat glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth, a weed that seriously threatens Georgia’s cotton production, and finding Georgia’s vegetable industry alternatives to the pesticide, methyl bromide. Culpepper has also been in the field, providing educational information to
growers on the importance of targeted pesticide applications.

Perhaps nothing is more valuable to Culpepper than his childhood growing up on a bicentennial family farm in North Carolina. He knows what it takes to be a successful farmer and hopes to provide a different perspective to the EPA’s Science Advisory Board.

“Hopefully, I can take that family-farm perspective and help those who are a little unfamiliar with our way of life better understand the complexities and difficulties farmers face each day,” Culpepper said. “In my experience as a weed scientist, working with the EPA to address significant issues facing our farmers has been almost all positive — a little painful at times, but still positive for agriculture, for me and I think even the EPA. I look forward to doing an even better job in the future.”

By Clint Thompson