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Peanut Information Network System

Research and Publications

Title | Problem Statement | Objectives | Progress | Publications | Background | Development Benefits | U.S. Benefits | Potential Impacts | Team

Title

IMPROVING LIVELIHOODS OF FARM HOUSEHOLDS IN PEANUT BASED FARMING SYSTEMS IN EAST AFRICA

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Problem Statement

Kenyan farmers have extended crop production to arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL), notably Nyanza & Coast provinces, but land degradation through grazing, continuous farming and drought conditions have lowered farm yields. Peanut farming could offer significant economic improvement for smallholder farmers in the ASAL because of the potential high returns per unit area, as well as its ability to improve soil fertility. Peanut farming also offers women an alternative source of income, thereby increasing their agency and empowerment.

The Kenyan Ministry of Agriculture research and extension activities have not adequately addressed the economics of peanut farming in the ASAL. The limited empirical evidence available shows that farmers achieve about 60% of their potential output compared to 77% for all studies reported. This suggests potential to improve farm performance and profitability using only existing technology.

Challenges facing the Kenya peanut industry include; incorporating better farming practices to conserve soil fertility, promoting technologies to increase yields, value addition and market expansion to improve quality and raise peanut output, and greater participation by women in agricultural programs.

The global importance of peanuts requires development of varieties with high nutritional and agronomic qualities. By undertaking the proposed project, the UConn and Kenyan partners will generate and dissiminate knowledge that can improve the economics of peanut farmers in Kenya and neighboring countries

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Objectives

1: Improve farm level data collection protocols and introduce standardized procedures for data collection and documentation 
Indicators: * Updated questionnaires * Primary farm level data set collected and a report documenting baseline information * Website containing data sets collected previously with appropriate documentation * MoA extension staff trained in data collection and organization * Purchase of office equipment (computers, printers, and LCD projector) 
Estimated Total Objective cost: $ 85000

2: Analyze the potential to increase household income through productivity growth in peanut farming systems 
Indicators: * Publications reporting analysis of production efficiency based on primary data collected * Farm level changes in technical efficiency over time 
Estimated Total Objective cost: $ 75000

3: Examine the impact of alternative peanut farming systems, including value-added activities, on resource use and income generation 
Indicators: * Reports on the profitability of alternative farming systems * Publications on the peanut value chain geared for policy makers and agricultural researchers 
Estimated Total Objective cost: $ 75000

4: Evaluate the determinants of technology adoption (fertilizer, improved seed varieties and selected farming practices) among peanut producers, including gender effects 
Indicators: * Reports on technology adoption to both policy makers and other stakeholders in agriculture * Quantitative farm level changes in technology * Number of women producers 
Estimated Total Objective cost: $ 65000

5: Work with Host Country collaborators to develop training materials and workshops on production economics and farm management, with special attention to women farmers 
Indicators: * Published materials for use by extensionists * Workshops organized to train trainers * Number of trainers trained * Number of women trained 
Estimated Total Objective cost: $ 50000

6: Provide partial support to train several professionals in agricultural economics and other relevant fields, both at the Ph. D. and M.S. levels, mainly in country 
Indicators: * Students completing advanced degrees * Women completing advanced degrees 
Estimated Total Objective cost: $ 150000

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Progress

 

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Publications

 

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Background

Agriculture remains the engine of growth for most economies in the Sub-Saharan region and this is certainly the case for the countries of interest in this project. The sector's contribution to GDP is 26% for Kenya and 40% for both Uganda and Ghana. Contribution to employment in the respective countries is roughly 80% for Kenya and Uganda, and 50% for Ghana (Kilambya, 2004; McKay & Aryeetey, 2004; UHDR, 2007). In the countries of interest, agriculture is the main source of food supplies for the large non-agricultural population and a source of raw materials to agro-based industries (Muigai, 2005; Nyanteng & Seini, 2000; UHDR, 2007). Although women dominate the agricultural labor force in Africa, development agencies have devoted limited resources to conduct research on technologies and activities that could positively impact the welfare of women farmers and their families (Lo, 2007; Kaaya, 2007)

Despite the prominent role of agriculture in Africa, poverty levels are particularly high among farmers and other rural dwellers, and resource deprivation for women remains a serious problem (IFAD, 2007). Some of the factors that lead to widespread poverty in Africa include low farm productivity, land degradation, high population growth rates, lack of employment opportunities, poor functioning markets and infrastructure, lack of information, low endowment of human capital, lack of access to development assets, high incidence of diseases particularly malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDs, and inappropriate economic policies (World Bank, 1996; Mwabu & Thorbecke, 2001; Ekbom, 2002). There is also a heavy concentration of poor people in particular geographical locations within a country. For example, in Uganda the northern region has the highest poverty rate, estimated at 70%, while in Kenya the Coast and Nyanza regions have an estimated rate of 60%. In Ghana, the northern and central regions exhibit the highest poverty levels (GoK, 2000; Okurut, 2002; IFAD, 2007).

Commonly grown in semi-arid areas, peanuts/groundnuts serve as a source of both food and cash in regions of West and East Africa and are produced along with other major crops, such as maize, sorghum, yams and millet. Research studies from Kenya, Ghana and Uganda reveal that farm yields for peanuts as well as for other major crops are considerably below achievable levels. The poor performance in peanut farming is attributed to lack of improved seeds, foliar diseases (peanut rosette and leaf spot), and poor pre- and post-harvest handling techniques that result in loss of value due to aflatoxin (Okoko, et al., 1998; Naab et al., 2005; Kaaya, 2007). Another factor contributing to low yields is poor soil fertility, which is a severe problem in many African countries. Use of inorganic fertilizers is recommended for cash and major cereal crops but adoption rates have remained low over the years. The few farmers who use inorganic fertilizers apply quantities far below the recommended rates. This low level of use stems from high costs associated with inorganic fertilizers coupled with low household incomes, low liquidity and lack of credit (Oluoch-Kosura, 1999; Makhoha et al., 2001)

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Development Benefits

This project will strengthen the capacity of Host Country institutions to design programs, including programs for women, focusing on the promotion of productivity and income growth in the agricultural sector. Host Country personnel will acquire methodological skills necessary for future research and collaboration. Partnerships with farmers will enhance the collaborating institutions ability to work with farmer groups to develop promising alternatives that provide rapid feedback and implementation.

The findings of this project, disseminated through publications and workshops, will give agricultural policy makers a better understanding of agricultural processes, how to encourage productivity, output and income growth, gender issues in agricultural development and changes in resource use over time within the study area. Benefits will also stem from the training of extensionists and researchers and the increased availability of training/teaching materials that can be used to reach farmers to promote sustainable growth in the peanut industry. Training of men and women extensionists will enable these professionals to be gender sensitive as they undertake future work with farmers.

The number of agricultural researchers will be increased through the formal training of graduate students. Full appreciation of the value of this training requires acknowledgement of the multiplier effect at work, as the students trained in this project will continue to teach other students and farmers. Moreover, at least five of the eight students to receive support in their degree training will be women, increasing the likelihood that gender sensitivity will factor into future agricultural projects undertaken by these professionals.

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U.S. Benefits

Collaboration with the various African institutions will deepen the knowledge and skills of UConn researchers, enabling them to work more effectively with Kenyan colleagues and others to strengthen the peanut industry. This project will also expand the capabilities and experience at UConn to do Women in Development work. Greater understanding of African agriculture will allow UConn to integrate new material into courses, thus enhancing the quality of instruction in agricultural and resource economics, and development studies. A larger benefit will accrue to agricultural researchers in general. Datasets developed through this project will be placed on the projects website and scientific articles beneficial to understanding agricultural development will be made available to a broad community of researchers.

The partnership with the African collaborators will expand UConn's global connections especially with developing countries in East and West Africa, thus enhancing the opportunities for future work by faculty and students.

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Potential Impacts

At the end of the formal project, several impacts can be expected:

1) Well documented and readily available data sets that can be utilized for different analyses related to peanut value chain research and the economics of alternative farming systems

2) Increased adoption of environmentally sound technologies that also contribute to higher productivity and incomes

3) Improved farm performance manifested in higher average farm productivity

4) Increased production and use of peanut products through improved farming techniques and marketing

5) Improved understanding of the role women play in value added activities related to peanuts at the farm level

6) An understanding of policies that can support agricultural growth, particularly in the peanut sector, with particular attention given to the role of gender

7) Several women and male extensionists will be trained

8) An informed community of producers and consumers who are aware of the nutrition and health related issues associated with aflatoxin, and of post- harvest options to minimize this problem

9) Individual and institutional capacity development to support the peanut sector and other crops grown in association with peanuts

10) Eight graduate students will be supported, including at least five wome

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Team

PI : Boris Bravo-Ureta 
Agricultural Economics
University of Connecticut 
2006 Hillside Road-1182 
Storrs CT 06269
boris.bravoureta@uconn.edu
Work: (860) 486-3152
Graduated from University of Nebraska in 1981
Research Focus and Accomplishments
Dr. Bravo-Ureta has been a Professor of Agricultural Economics at the University of Connecticut since 1980. He became the Executive Director of International Affairs on July 1, 1998, where he has oversight of and is responsible for the coordination of international activities at UConn. His technical expertise is in production economics, development economics and project evaluation. He has conducted extensive research on the forces leading to the growth of agricultural output with special reference to technological change, technical efficiency, economies of size, supply response, and natural resource management on hillside agriculture. His research has focused on the US dairy sector and on the economics of agricultural production systems in West Africa and several Latin American Countries including Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, The Dominican Republic, Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. He has taught courses in agricultural marketing, production economics, benefit-cost analysis, microeconomic theory and economic development.

His work has led to numerous referred journal articles, chapters in books, technical reports and conference papers. He has also given numerous invited lectures in many countries and to a variety of audiences.

International Experience
Dr. Bravo-Ureta has served as a consultant to various organizations and has traveled extensively. His work has been funded by several institutions including the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. Dep. of Education, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation, the Central American Bank for Economic Integration, Chemonics International, TechnoServe, the U.S. Dep. of Agriculture, The Chilean Ministry of Agriculture, Fundacion Chile, The Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station and The University of Talca in Chile.

Dr. Bravo-Ureta has managed a number of different international research and training programs and has undertaken numerous consulting assignments. He has collaborated in different capacities with a wide range of professionals around the world and has published extensively with many of them. Recent projects include:

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE "Principles and Practice of Agribusiness Management: An International Seminar". July-August, 2007 (Program Director).

U.S. AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT/ PEANUT CRSP - "Socioeconomic Analysis of Peanut Production in Senegal and other West African Countries." 2001-2007 (U.S. P. I.)

U.S.-MIDDLE EAST PARTNERSHIP INITIATIVE (MEPI) - "Menoufia University-University of Connecticut Partnership to Promote Women in Development in Egypt." December 2005-(Partnership Co-Director).

INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (IDB)-OFFICE OF EVALUATION AND OVERSIGHT (OVE) - "Assessing On-Site Benefits Associated with The Environmental Program for El Salvador-PAES: Phase II." April 2005-April 2006 (P.I.).

U.S. AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT/Mexico TIES Partnership - "Enhancing the Marine Sciences and Coastal Management Programs at the Universidad Autonoma de Baja California and the University of Connecticut." November 2002-September 2004 (Partnership Co-Director).

Relevant Publications
Solis, D., B. E. Bravo-Ureta and R. E. Quiroga. "Soil Conservation and Technical Efficiency among Hillside Farmers in Central America: A Switching Regression Model." Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics (2007): Forthcoming.

Bravo-Ureta, B. E., D. Solis, V. Moreira, J. Maripani, A. Thiam and T. Rivas. "Technical Efficiency in Farming: A Meta-Regression Analysis." Journal of Productivity Analysis 27-1(2007): 57-72.

Bravo-Ureta, B. E., D. Solis, H. Cocchi and R. E. Quiroga. "The Impact of Soil Conservation and Output Diversification on Farm Income in Central American Hillside Farming." Agricultural Economics 35(2006): 267-276.

Cisse, A., B. E. Bravo-Ureta, P. Fuentes and A. Thiam. "An Economic Analysis of Agricultural Production in Senegal: A Case Study of the Thies and Diourbel Regions." Journal of Developing Societies 1-2(2004): 3-19.

Thiam, A. and B. E. Bravo-Ureta. "Technical Efficiency Measures for a Sample of Senegalese Peanut Producers Using Pooled Cross-Section Time-Series Data." International Arachis Newsletter 23(2003): 36-39.

Professional History
1975-76 Teaching Assistant, University of Wisconsin - River Falls

1977-80 Research Assistant, University of Nebraska

1980-87 Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut

1987-88 Visiting Faculty Fellow, Economic Growth Center, Yale University

1987-94 Associate Professor, University of Connecticut

1992 March and August, Visiting Professor, Ecole Nationale d'Economie Appliquee, Dakar, Senegal

1994 Professor, University of Connecticut

1994-95 Visiting Professor, Universidad de Talca, Chile

1995 Adjunct Professor, Universidad de Talca, Chile

1998 Executive Director, Office of International Affairs, University of Connecticut

 

Co-PI : Evelyn Okoko 
Horticulture 2134828362
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute 
P.O. Box 523 
Kisii Kenya 40200
nasambu_okoko@yahoo.co.uk
Cell: (254) 722 208008
Graduated from Sydney-Hawkesbury, Australia in 1995
Research Focus and Accomplishments
Ms. Nasambu Okoko has been a researcher in the Horticultural section at KARI since 1988. She started her profession as an Assistant Horticultural Research Officer at KARI and through training she has been promoted to a Senior Research Officer. She has broad experience through research in the production of horticultural crops in the country. At KARI-Kisii Research Center, she has coordinated projects funded by Rockefeller foundation on on-farm improvement in soil management and farmer field schools. She also coordinates the horticultural and industrial crop section and related research programs at the Center. She is a trainerin farmer field schools and gives technical guidance to Community Based Organizations under Agricultural Technology Information Initiative (ATIRI) program on technologies related to horticulture and oil crops. Her work also involves building partnership with other research institutions, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) and government agencies to establish research linkages. She develops and disseminates horticultural and industrial crop technologies that are relevant to the KARI-Kisii mandate region. She is also a member of the Center Editorial and ATIRI Steering Committees.
International Experience
Ms. Okoko is involved with programs that are funded by international donors. Under the Rockefeller foundation, she coordinated programs on On-farm improvement in soil management from 1996 to 2002 and farmer field schools from 2001 to 2002.

Her work as a Horticultural Teaching Assistant at the University of Western Sydney Hawkesbury, Canada gave her ample experience in her professional development as a researcher in horticulture and industrial crops.

To improve her skills in research, she has attended trainings on Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Bananas and production of extension materials, both hosted at Kawanda Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) in Kampala. She also attended a training on improving the safety and quality of fresh fruits and vegetables chain hosted at the University of Pretoria, South Africa.

Relevant Publications
Kidula N.L., Okoko E.N.K., Maobe S.N. and Makworo S. Statistical Analysis of On-farm Trials in Soil Management. Paper Presented in the Second Scientific Conference of the Soil Management and Legume Research Network Projects 26-30 June 2000 Mombasa.

Ogecha, J., Okoko, E.N.K., Makini, F., Owuor, J. and Okach, I. 2001. Farmer Participatory Approach to On-farm IPM Development of Bean Stem Maggot Control in SouthWest Kenya In PABRA Millennium Synthesis Conference on Bean Research and Development in Africa over the last Decade, Novotel, Mount Meru, Arusha.

Okoko, E.N.K., F.W. Makini and J. G. Mureithi 2000. A Farmer Participatory Approach to On-farm Soil Management Research in Southwest Kenya. A Poster Paper Presented at III International Seminar & Small Grants Workshop Uniting Science and Participation in Research, 6-11 November, Nairobi, Kenya.

Okoko E.N.K., Makini F.W., Kidula N.L. and Mureithi J.G. 2000. Experiences with Farmers Participatory Research Approach in Implementing Soil Management Project in Kisii, Southwest Kenya. Paper Presented in the Second Scientific Conference of the Soil Management and Legume Research Network Projects 26-30 June 2000 Mombasa.

Okoko, E.N.K., F. Makini and J.G. Mureithi 2000. On-farm Evaluation of the Effect of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on Maize and Traditional Vegetable yields in Kisii highlands. A Poster Paper Presented in the 18th Conference Soil Science Society of East Africa held on 4th to 8th December 2000 at Mombasa Continental Resort, Mombasa Kenya.

Professional History
2001-Current Senior Research Officer, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute

1995-2000 Horticultural Research Officer, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute

1992-1995 Horticulture Teaching Assistant, University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury

1988-1995 Assistant Horticultural Research Officer, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute

 

Participant : Benjamin Muli 
Agronomy
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute 
P.O Box 16 
Mtwapa kenya 80109
muli@sahmun.com
Cell: (254) 722 841390
Graduated from University of British Columbia in 1995
Research Focus and Accomplishments
Mr. Benjamin Muli is an agronomist working under the food crops program with a research experience of 22 years. He worked as a Research Officer 11 from 1985 to 1995 and was promoted to Research Officer 1. In 2001, he was promoted to Senior Research Officer. Mr. Muli has published in conference proceedings and other technical bulletins. He is a member of East African Root Crops Research Network (EARRNET) and East and Central Africa Maize and Wheat working group (ECAMAW) networks. At KARI Mtwapa, he is in charge of the food crops program and a member of various committees namely: Publication and Editorial Committee, Center Staff Advisory Committee, Center Land Allocation and Farm Produce Committee, Center Housing and Security Committee and Center Technical Committee.
International Experience
Mr. Benjamin Muli has acquired a lot of experience at the KARI-Mtwapa RRC working under international funded projects. As a researcher, Mr. Muli worked with the International Development Association (IDA) funded project on maize and pigeon-pea research at the Coastal Region of Kenya from 2000 to 2003. Under Rockefeller funded projects he implemented the cassava improvement project in the year 2003 and is currently working with the Soil and Water Management Project at the Coast. From 2001 to date, Mr. Muli has been working with the East and Central Africa Maize and Wheat Working group network through International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT); evaluating Nitrogen Efficient Use (NUE) in maize and Quality Protein Maize (QPM). He also worked with the Netherlands funded project in Kilifi and Kwale districts from 1995 to 1999; Strengthening Regional Research Programmes (SRRP) where he participated in the evaluation of improved maize varieties and fertilizer use with farmers. Mr. Muli is constantly involved in research and has published and presented papers in research scientific conferences and workshops which include proceedings in the International Symposium on Agricultural Innovation Systems in Africa, Soil Science Society of East Africa Conferences. He is a member of the East African Root Crops Research Network (EARRNET), and the East and Central Africa Maize and Wheat working group (ECAMAW) networks. His work has been published in the Journal of Applied Ecology.
Relevant Publications
Saha, H.M. and M.B. Muli. 2002. Effects of Combining Green Manure Legumes, Farmyard Manure and Inorganic Fertilizer on Yield of Maize in Coastal Kenya. In J.G. Mureithi, C.K.K. Gachene, F.M. Miyekho, M. Onyango, L.Mose and O. Magenya.(ed.) Participatory Technology Development for Soil Management by Smallholder Farmers in Kenya. Proceedings of the Second Scientific Conference of the Soil Management and Legume Research Network Project. Mombasa, Kenya. 26-30 June 2000.

Muli M.B., H.M. Saha, A. M. Mzingirwa and K.K. Lewa. 2006. Innovative Methods for Linking Farmers to Inputs Markets through Farmer Field School Networks for Increased Production and Food Security. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Agricultural Innovation Systems in Africa . Kampala, Uganda, 21-23 November 2006.

Njunie M.N., M.B. Muli and J.G. Mureithi. 2006. Benefits of Integrating Forage and Grain Legumes in Maize/Cassava Relay and Rotation Cropping Systems in Coastal Kenya. Proceedings of the 10th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 13-17 November 2006. Nairobi, Kenya.

Saha, H.M., M.B. Muli, A.M. Mzingirwa, J.M. N dungu and K.K. Lewa. 2006. Scaling-out Benefits of Technologies through Farmer Field School Networks: A Case Study of INM Technologies. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Agricultural Innovation Systems in Africa . Kampala, Uganda, 21-23 November 2006.

Lewa K.K., J. Ndungu, J. Njuki, M.N. Njunie, S. Bimbuzi, A. Mzingirwa, M.B. Muli, and S. Kaaria. 2006. Enhancing Community Empowerment through Community Driven Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation Systems. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Agricultural Innovation Systems in Africa. Kampala, Uganda, 21-23 November 2006.

Professional History
1989 to date Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI)-Mtwapa RRC

2002 to date Working under Rockefeller funded Soil and Water Management Project

2001 to date Evaluating Nitrogen Efficient Use (NUE) maize and Quality Protein Maize (QPM) under East and Central Africa Maize and Wheat Working group network through CIMMYT

2003-2003 Working under Rockefeller funded cassava improvement project

2000-2003 Working under IDA funded projects

1997-2000: Evaluated high yielding and pest tolerant cowpea varieties for their adaptation under coastal lowlands conditions

1995-1999: Working under Netherlands funded project; Strengthening Regional Research Programmes (SRRP)

1991-1992: Working under Kwale-Kilifi Adaptive Research Project (KKARP) as legumes agronomist

1985-1991: Working as a legume agronomist where he developed a recommendation for optimum cowpea leaf harvesting in relation to grain yield

1985-89: Agricultural Officer, Ministry of Agriculture, Scientific Research Division

 

Participant : Felister Makini 
Plant Pathology
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute 
P. O. Box 523 
Kisii Kenya 40200
fmakini2@yahoo.com
Work: (254) 058 31800
Graduated from University of Greenwich, UK in 1999
Research Focus and Accomplishments
Dr. Felister Makini is a Researcher at KARI since 1983. She became the Centre Director in 1994, where apart from administration duties she is involved in development and implementation of the Center's programs/and projects. Her technical expertise is in plant pathology and she has a broad experience in bacteriology and in advisory laboratories both at KARI and National Agricultural Research Laboratories (NARL). She is actively involved in the Center's plant pathology and farmer participatory research activities. She works to ensure the RRC research mandate of developing adaptive and demand driven research is addressed. In research, she focuses in the development of tolerant varieties for the major crops in Southwest Kenya, adoption of sustainable low-cost soil management techniques and improved agricultural technologies through farmer participatory research, improving the dairy sector, seed multiplication, and on-farm farmer participatory variety evaluation and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approaches. As a director, Dr. Makini has concentrated in building and maintaining international partnership with donor agents like Rockefeller Foundation, DFID, World Bank, USAID etc.) and collaborates with IARCS (CIAT, CIP, ICIPE, ICRAF etc.), NARS (KIRDI, KEFRI), NGOs (CMAD, Care-Kenya), department of agricultural extension services and community based organisations. She is the Chairperson of the Board of Directors for the Community Mobilization Against Desertification (CMAD)
International Experience
Dr. Felister Makini has gained alot of experience as a director at KARI-Kisii Regional Research Center (RRC) and as a researcher which involves working with international agencies. As a director, she works to build and maintain partnerships with international donors like Rockefeller Foundation, Department for International Development (DFID), World Bank, and USAID etc. In research, Dr. Makini collaborates with International Agricultural Research Centers (IARCS) for example the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Centre for International Policy (CIP), International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), and International Centre for Research in Agro-forestry (ICRAF). She is constantly involved in research and has published and presented papers in national and regional scientific conferences and workshops which include the Annual Scientific Conferences in Kenya, Soil Science Society of East Africa Conferences, the Pan Africa Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) Millennium Synthesis Conference and in all Africa Crop Science Congress. She has also submitted a paper for publication in the Journal of Tropical Microbiology.
Relevant Publications
Ogecha, J., Makini, F. and Sutherland, A. 2004. Development of Promotional Strategy for Crop Protection Output in the Semi-arid Areas of Western Kenya: Proceedings of Stakeholders' Workshop at Marsh Park Hotel Kisii, Kenya 3rd to 5th February 2004.

Ogecha, J., Okoko, E.N.K., Makini, F., Owuor, J. and Okach, I. 2001. Farmer Participatory Approach to On-farm IPM Development of Bean Stem Maggot Control in Southwest Kenya In PABRA Millennium Synthesis Conference on Bean Research and Development in Africa over the last Decade, Novotel, Mount Meru, Arusha.

Makini, F.W. and Hayden, N. 2005. Survival of Pyricularia grisea on Finger Millet (Eleucine coracana) in Relation to Farmers Circumstances and the likely Implications on Disease Carry Over. Paper Submitted for Publications in The Journal of Tropical Microbiology

Okoko, E.N.K., Makini, F.W. and Mureithi, J.G. 2000. On-farm Evaluation of the Effect of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on Maize and Traditional Vegetable Yields in Kisii Highlands. A Poster Paper Presented in the 18th Conference Soil Science Society of East Africa held on 4th to 8th December 2000 at Mombasa Continental Resort, Mombasa Kenya.

Okoko, E.N.K., Makini, F.W. and Mureithi, J.G. 2000. A Farmer Participatory Approach to On-farm Soil Management Research in Southwest Kenya. A Poster Paper Presented at III International Seminar & Small Grants Workshop "Uniting Science and Participation in Research" 6-11 November, Nairobi, Kenya.

Professional History
1994-Current: Centre Director, Kisii-RRC

1994-Current: Involvement in Farmer Participatory Research, Kisii RRC

1983-1994: Research Officer, (Plant Pathology) at KARI, RRC-Mtwapa and National Agricultural Research Laboratories (NARL), RRC-Kisii

1990-1992: Head of Section (Research- Extension-Linkage), KARI, RRC-Kisii

1988-1990: Head of Bacteriology Laboratory, KARI, NARL

1984-1986: Working in advisory laboratory at KARI, NARL (Plant Clinic)

1990-1994: Head of section (Plant pathology), Kisii, RRC

 

Participant : Patrick Obeng-Asiedu 
Development Economics
University of Connecticut 
2006 Hillside Road, U-1182 
Storrs CT 6269
patrick.obeng-asiedu@uconn.edu
Work: (860) 486 3152
Graduated from University of Bonn, Germany in 2004
Research Focus and Accomplishments
Dr. Obeng-Asiedu has his technical expertise in development economics, resource economics, and production economics. He has conducted research on the river basin modeling, street-food economics, the exchange rate and it effects on deforestation, and on water issues. His research has focused on the economics of agricultural production systems in West Africa. He has taught courses in microeconomic, macroeconomic theory, environmental and resource economics in addition to statistics. He is currently managing a training program at the University of Connecticut and has collaborated in different capacities with a wide range of professionals around the world and of which some of the work has been published.
International Experience
Dr. Obeng-Asiedu is the Coordinator for the Global Training Development Institute (GTDI) of the Office of International Affairs at the University of Connecticut since July 2007. He is also an Adjunct Faculty of Economics at Eastern Connecticut State University. His technical expertise is in production economics, development economics, environmental and resource economics. He has conducted research and has served as a lead economist to vaious projects funded by the British Overseas Development Projects (ODA) in Ghana.
Relevant Publications
Obeng-Asiedu, P. and K. Yerfi Fosu (2007) Effect of the Real Exchange on Deforestation in Ghana. Paper Submitted to the African Economies, forthcoming.

Obeng-Asiedu, P. (2004) Allocating Water Resources to Agricultural and Economic Development in the Volta River Basin. Economics and Management, Series IV Peter Lang Publishers: Essen, Germany.

Obeng-Asiedu, P. van de Giesen, N., T. Berger, C. Ringler, A. van Edig, Barnabas Amisigo, Maria, Iskandarani (2002). Integrating Economy, Hydrology, and Institutional Analysis for Water Management. ZEF News, No. 9, February.

Obeng-Asiedu, P. van de Giesen, N., T. Berger, C. Ringler, A. van Edig, M. Andreini (2001). Integration of Physical and Social Sciences in Regional Resource Modeling in the GLOWA Volta Project. Poster Presented at Open Meeting, Human Dimension of Global Environmental Change Research, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 6-8 October.

Thuo, M. W., B. E. Bravo-Ureta., I. Hathie, and P. Obeng-Asiedu. (2007). Adoption of Chemical Fertilizer by Smallholder Farmers in the Peanut Basin of Senegal. Unpublished Manuscript, University of Connecticut, Storrs.

Professional History
Ph.D. - 2004 Development Economics, University of Bonn, Germany

MPhil. - 1999 Agricultural Economics, University of Ghana, Legon- Accra, Ghana

B.S. - 1993 Agricultural Economics, Kwame, Ghana

 

Participant : Mary Thuo 
Agricultural Economics
University of Connecticut 
2006 Hillside, Unit 1182 
Storrs CT 6269
mary.thuo@uconn.edu
Work: (860) 486 3152
Graduated from University of Connecticut in 2006
Research Focus and Accomplishments
Ms. Mary Thuo has worked with the Ministry of Agriculture (Department of Extension, Research Liaison, and Training Development) for 17 years. She worked as an Assistant Agricultural Officer II from 1987 to 2002 and served at the location, division and district levels. She was promoted to the level of Agricultural Officer II in 2002. Mary also served as the District Monitoring and Evaluation/Manpower Development Officer in year 2004. Her responsibilities included working on women and youth programs at the district level. In addition, she supervised field extension staff on agricultural activities, identified training needs for staff and organized trainings for the farmers. she also worked with farmers, and other stakeholders to ensure projects designed for the farmers addressed their needs and were environmentally sound. This was achieved through collaboration among government extension agents, other service providers and farmers in project planning and implementation. Ms. Thuo also liaised with researchers at the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) at Mtwapa-RRC in the transfer of knowledge and improved technologies to farmers.
International Experience
Ms. Mary Thuo has been a research assistant in the Office of International Affairs (OIA) at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, from 2004 to date. Involvement in the PCRSP program for Senegal has helped Ms. Thuo gain ample knowledge of the peanut industry in Africa. This includes formulating research work that is relevant to the development of the peanut industry in developing countries. In addition, as a research assistant, Ms. Thuo is involved in data organization and analysis which is an advantage in her profession.
Relevant Publications
Thuo, M. W., B. E. Bravo-Ureta., I. Hathie, and P. Obeng-Asiedu. (2007). Adoption of Chemical Fertilizer by Smallholder Farmers in the Peanut Basin of Senegal. Unpublished Manuscript, University of Connecticut, Storrs.

Thuo M. W. (2006). Adoption of Chemical Fertilizer by Smallholder Farmers in the Peanut Basin of Senegal: 1998-2004. MS Thesis, University of Connecticut, Storrs.

Professional History
2004-Current: Research Assistant at the University of Connecticut

2003-2004: District Monitoring and Evaluation/ Manpower Development Officer Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), Kenya

2002-2003: District Rural Youth Officer, MoA, Kenya

1990-1999: Divisional Home-Economic/Rural Youth officer, MoA, Kenya

1987-1990: Location Extension Officer, MoA, Kenya

 

Participant : Elizabeth Mahan 
Communication Science
University of Connecticut 
2006 Hillside Road, U-1182 
Storrs CT 6269
elizabeth.mahan@uconn.edu
Work: (860) 486 3152
Graduated from University of Texas, Austin in 1982
Research Focus and Accomplishments
Dr.Elizabeth Mahan is the Associate Executive Director of the Office of International Affairs and Associate Extension Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Connecticut. She coordinates the University's international and area studies degree programs, serves as the campus Fulbright Program Advisor and works with faculty and OIA staff to develop and administer international grants for university linkages and international projects. Her recent grants include: Middle East Partnership Initiative, US Dept of State/USAID, Menoufia University-University of Connecticut Partnership to Promote Women in Development, 2005 (Co-PI).

U.S. Department of Education, Fund for the Improvement of Post-secondary Education, US-Brazil Higher Education Consortium Grant, "Sustainable Coastal Resource Management," 2004 (PI).

U.S. Department of Education, Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Grant, "Mexico Seminar for High School Teachers," 2003 (PI).

U.S. Department of State, Educational Partnership Program, "Deepening Democracy In Guatemala Through Educational Partnership," 2002 (PI).

William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, "Navigating the Storm: Constructions of Democracy in Latin America," 2001 (PI).

Dr. Mahan has been associated with the UConn Latin American Studies program since 1985, serving as director of the Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies from 1992-2002. She is a past president of the New England Council of Latin American Studies, the Association of Academic Programs in Latin American and the Caribbean (APPLAC), and the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs, and has served as Secretary-Treasurer of CLASP since 2001.

Before assuming full-time administrative responsibilities, Dr. Mahan published on media-state relations and popular culture in Latin America, in addition to consulting on the development of undergraduate programs in international and area studies.

International Experience
Summer 1970 Study abroad in France.

Visiting Reference Librarian, Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico, San German, 1977.

Field Research on media-state relations in Latin America: Mexico, 1981, 1983, 1986; Dominican Republic, 1984; Venezuela, 1993.

Conference presentations and lectures between 1980 and 2006 in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Venezuela and Colombia.

Administrative project-related work in Brazil ( Sustainable Coastal Resource Management in Niteroi/Rio and Joao Pesso) in 2006 and 2007, and in Egypt (Women in Development in Cairo and Shibin El Kom) in 2006 and 2007.

Languages

Spanish: good reading and speaking, fair writing

French: good reading, fair speaking and writing

Relevant Publications
2007. "Mexico: Peoples, Geography and Material Culture", Primary Source, Watertown, MA, March 28.

2006. "Being Interdisciplinary: Getting Students Beyond Their Undergraduate Majors", Latin American Studies Association Congress, San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 17.

2006. Administration of Study Abroad at the University of Connecticut, Annual Conference of the Association of Academic Programs in Latin America & the Caribbean,Cuetzalan, Mexico, February 23.

2004. "Internationalization: What, Why and How?" Nicolet College, Rhinelander, WI, January 14.

2002. The Future of Area Studies: Everybody's Talkin' 'Bout the New Sounds, Honey, but It's still Rock 'n Roll to Me, Tulane University, April 16.

Professional History
1969-71 University of Maine, Orono, Teaching Assistant (French)

1971-72 Canal National Bank, Portland, Maine, Teller

1973-74 Human Relations Area Files, New Haven, CT, Research Assistant

1974-78 University of Massachusetts, Amherst: Reference Librarian

1983-85 Yale University: Yale Center for International and Area Studies, Program Coordinator

1982-83 Council on Latin American Studies, Outreach Coordinator

1985-87 University of Connecticut Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies: Assistant Professor in Residence

1987-88 University of Texas at Austin, Visiting Assistant Professor

1988-92 University of Connecticut, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies: Assistant Professor in Residence

1992-present University of Connecticut, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies: Associate Extension Professor

1985-87 University of Connecticut, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies: Outreach Coordinator

1988-2002 University of Connecticut, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies: Director

2005-06 University of Connecticut, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies: Interim Director

2001-present University of Connecticut, Office of International Affairs, Associate Executive Director

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