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Welcome to the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program!

The Master Gardener program in Georgia is a volunteer training program designed to help University of Georgia Cooperative Extension staff transfer research-based information about gardening and related subjects to the public by training home gardeners. Master Gardener Extension Volunteers are active in many Georgia counties. Through this program, Cooperative Extension is able to reach out and serve more citizens with educational programming and demonstrations in these 5 target areas:

Environmental Stewardship – Increasing awareness and knowledge of landscape and garden management for the optimum use and protection of the environment, including management of all aspects of the residential landscape (soil, plants, insects, diseases, and wildlife); and understanding and proper use of equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, and other landscaping inputs to have the greatest value with little negative impact on the environment.

Home Food Production – Teaching the benefits of home food production and developing skills and knowledge in growing food, managing community gardens, or contributing to food banks or kitchens.

Gardening with Youth – Increasing young people’s awareness and understanding of the value of horticulture and landscaping, using horticulture as a tool to increase responsibility and leadership for youth, and teaching individuals and professionals (i.e., teachers and therapists) how to use horticulture to reach young people.

Value of Landscapes – Developing within communities the knowledge and skill to ensure proper design, installation, and maintenance of sustainable landscapes for economic benefit to residents, state and local government employees and agencies, and professionals in impacted fields, such as tourism and real-estate development.

Health Benefits of Gardening – Teaching the value of the interior and exterior landscape to human health, well-being, and quality of life, transferring knowledge and skills to intended audiences that they might utilize this information for personal health and a healthier workplace and community.

Volunteers benefit from the training, networking with other garden enthusiasts and the opportunity to serve their communities. For more information about the Master Gardener program in your area, contact the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office nearest you.

Looking for an answer to a gardening question? Use your ZIP code to search for the UGA Cooperative Extension office nearest you or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 to connect.

 

News from Georgia FACES!

  • New entomologist eyes different approach in studying insects
    April 23, 2015 - The University of Georgia’s newest entomologist is eyeing a different approach to studying insects in multiple agricultural crops. Instead of focusing on how to eliminate pests that reduce yield and negatively impact profits, UGA entomologist Jason Schmidt is looking to improve agricultural management systems to preserve helpful insects.
  • Human landscapes can offer safety to imperiled pollinators
    April 23, 2015 - There are more than 4,000 species of native bees in North America — from plump, stalwart carpenter bees to the hardworking blueberry bees that help pollinate the state’s top fruit crop.
  • UGA Extension, Food Bank of Northeast Georgia partner to increase access to local food, jobs
    April 23, 2015 - The Food Bank of Northeast Georgia’s food hub, housed in its Rabun County facility, will be the first in the country to leverage a regional food bank’s supply chain to help farmers aggregate and preserve their produce. In partnership with University of Georgia Extension, the organizations will join forces to increase access to local food and local jobs.
  • Tiny insect saws through rose bushes
    April 23, 2015 - Dozens of calls and samples of roses with a variety of leaf problems are coming into the University of Georgia Extension office in Bartow County. The most common problem diagnosed this year is injury caused by rose sawflies, also known as rose slugs.
  • Georgia farmers advised to check irrigation systems, equipment before using this spring
    April 22, 2015 - University of Georgia Extension irrigation specialist Wes Porter advises farmers to check their irrigation systems and equipment for any problems before getting in the field this spring.
  • UGA peanut agronomist cautions peanut producers against planting early
    April 16, 2015 - Unusually warm weather conditions and high soil temperatures have Georgia farmers itching to plant peanuts, but University of Georgia peanut agronomist Scott Monfort cautions peanut producers to hold off until the end of April or beginning of May.

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