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Welcome to the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program!

The Master Gardener program in Georgia is a volunteer training program designed to help University of Georgia Cooperative Extension staff transfer research-based information about gardening and related subjects to the public by training home gardeners. Master Gardener Extension Volunteers are active in many Georgia counties. Through this program, Cooperative Extension is able to reach out and serve more citizens with educational programming and demonstrations in these 5 target areas:

Environmental Stewardship – Increasing awareness and knowledge of landscape and garden management for the optimum use and protection of the environment, including management of all aspects of the residential landscape (soil, plants, insects, diseases, and wildlife); and understanding and proper use of equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, and other landscaping inputs to have the greatest value with little negative impact on the environment.

Home Food Production – Teaching the benefits of home food production and developing skills and knowledge in growing food, managing community gardens, or contributing to food banks or kitchens.

Gardening with Youth – Increasing young people’s awareness and understanding of the value of horticulture and landscaping, using horticulture as a tool to increase responsibility and leadership for youth, and teaching individuals and professionals (i.e., teachers and therapists) how to use horticulture to reach young people.

Value of Landscapes – Developing within communities the knowledge and skill to ensure proper design, installation, and maintenance of sustainable landscapes for economic benefit to residents, state and local government employees and agencies, and professionals in impacted fields, such as tourism and real-estate development.

Health Benefits of Gardening – Teaching the value of the interior and exterior landscape to human health, well-being, and quality of life, transferring knowledge and skills to intended audiences that they might utilize this information for personal health and a healthier workplace and community.

Volunteers benefit from the training, networking with other garden enthusiasts and the opportunity to serve their communities. For more information about the Master Gardener program in your area, contact the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office nearest you.

Looking for an answer to a gardening question? Use your ZIP code to search for the UGA Cooperative Extension office nearest you or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 to connect.

 

News from Georgia FACES!

  • UGA entomologist stresses scouting fields for pests to Georgia peanut farmers
    July 2, 2015 - Mark Abney’s message to Georgia peanut farmers is the same today as it was two years ago, when he was hired as the University of Georgia’s research and Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist: “We need to be scouting more of our peanuts.”
  • Pecan blog useful tool in UGA reaching growers across the world
    July 1, 2015 - A pecan blog is helping University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulture specialist Lenny Wells reach growers in Georgia and across the world.
  • UGA breaks ground on new turfgrass research and education facilities
    June 29, 2015 - More than 200 people gathered June 24 for a groundbreaking ceremony that brought new turfgrass research and education facilities on the University of Georgia’s campuses in Griffin, Tifton and Athens one step closer to completion.
  • Soaring temperatures have watermelon farmers feeling the heat
    June 23, 2015 - High summer temperatures and intense sun could reduce Georgia's end-of-season watermelon production this year, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Tim Coolong. Because of the increased heat over the past week, risk of sunburn for watermelons in the field has been high. If watermelons do scald, they may not be marketable, which may reduce farmers’ normal timeframe for selling their crop.
  • Fewer Vidalia onions expected this year
    June 17, 2015 - Heavy rainfall and high winds contributed to Georgia farmers growing fewer Vidalia onions this year, but demand for the popular vegetable and low yields for Texas onions helped keep prices steady.
  • UGA apps bring expert lawn-care advice to mobile devices
    June 16, 2015 - Summertime is synonymous with cooking outdoors, taking a dip in the pool and cranking up the lawn mower to begin the arduous task of caring for your home lawn. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has made the task a little easier through a few mobile apps for Georgia homeowners and green industry professionals alike.

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University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)