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Welcome to the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer Program!

The Master Gardener program in Georgia is a volunteer training program designed to help University of Georgia Cooperative Extension staff transfer research-based information about gardening and related subjects to the public by training home gardeners. Master Gardener Extension Volunteers are active in many Georgia counties. Through this program, Cooperative Extension is able to reach out and serve more citizens with educational programming and demonstrations in 5 target areas.

State Initiatives

Environmental Stewardship – Increasing awareness and knowledge of landscape and garden management for the optimum use and protection of the environment, including management of all aspects of the residential landscape (soil, plants, insects, diseases, and wildlife), understanding and proper use of equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, and other landscaping inputs to have the greatest value with little negative impact on the environment.

Home Food Production – Teaching the benefits of home food production and developing skills and knowledge in growing food, managing community gardens, or contributing to food banks or kitchens.

Gardening with Youth – Increasing young people’s awareness and understanding of the value of horticulture and landscaping, using horticulture as a tool to increase responsibility and leadership for youth, and teaching individuals and professionals (i.e., teachers and therapists) how to use horticulture to reach young people.

Value of Landscapes – Developing within communities the knowledge and skill to ensure proper design, installation, and maintenance of sustainable landscapes for economic benefit to residents, state and local government employees and agencies, and professionals in impacted fields, such as tourism and real-estate development.

Health Benefits of Gardening – Teaching the value of the interior and exterior landscape for human health, well-being, and quality of life, transferring knowledge and skills to intended audiences so that they might utilize this information for personal health and a healthier workplace and community.

Volunteers benefit from the training, networking with other garden enthusiasts, and the opportunity to serve their communities. For more information about the Master Gardener program in your area, contact the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office nearest you.

Looking for an answer to a gardening question? Use your ZIP code to search for the UGA Cooperative Extension office nearest you or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 to connect.

 

News from Georgia FACES!

  • Add attractive plants to your landscape that provide nutritious fruit, too
    April 28, 2016 - The key to creating a visually appealing edible landscape is the artful combination of annuals and perennials. Most edible plants can act as substitutes for annual plants, but there are some options that can substitute for shrubs, vines and small trees.
  • Winter's warmer temperatures a boost for some Georgia watermelon farmers
    April 26, 2016 - Winter’s mild temperatures and sunny days helped some Georgia farmers keep from falling behind with their watermelon plantings this spring, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong.
  • Prune spring-flowering shrubs after the flower show ends
    April 21, 2016 - Spring-flowering plants are beginning to pop with color. As soon as their color fades, landscapers can prepare to prune and groom these plants.
  • UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recognizes international service and scholarship
    April 20, 2016 - From rice fields in western Africa to sheep pastures in Uruguay, students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental sciences travel the world each year to learn how to build a more food-secure future. CAES faculty, students and administrators gathered Tuesday to celebrate the college’s international mission and accomplishments at the sixth annual International Agriculture Day reception.
  • Pecan production becoming more popular in Georgia
    April 19, 2016 - Undeterred by the possibility that Georgia pecans might flood the market in six or seven years, the increasing popularity of the crop has University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells encouraged about the future of the state's pecans.
  • Georgia 4-H to combat erosion at Tybee Island's Burton 4-H Center
    April 14, 2016 - Georgia 4-H is recruiting an army of bivalves to help ensure the future of the organization’s coastal environmental education center. The organization is working with University of Georgia Marine Extension to encourage new oyster beds along the marshy shoreline at Burton 4-H Center on Tybee Island, Georgia.

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University of Georgia (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)