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Development of Spicy Meat Analogs and Technology Transfer of Value-added Products from Peanuts

Approach

The goal of NCA 32U was to develop meat-peanut protein products that meet consumer desires, and to extend acceptable products to the consumers/markets in the Caribbean region and the U.S.

Achievements

A consumer survey was conducted in North Carolina to evaluate the feasibility of meat analogs consisting of peanuts cooperatively with AUB 30S. Results indicated that the frequency of consumption as well as the amount of money spent on peanuts and peanut products was low. Interest in meat-peanut analogs was expressed, if the price was comparable to traditional meat products. Preliminary studies were made on extrusion of partially defatted peanut flour. Host country (Belize, Jamaica, and Haiti) personnel were trained in aspects of peanut processing, product development, and quality enhancement. Host country activities have produced three major activities supporting development of peanut products as follows. 1) In Jamaica, 46 potential peanut products were displayed to small scale processors at an Agricultural Show. A technical bulletin on these products was being prepared. Processors were particularly interested in manufacturing honey-roasted and hot-and-spicy peanuts. 2) In Haiti, efforts were being made to improve the quality of Mamba (peanut butter-type product). Small-scale processors are manufacturing spicy and non-spicy Mamba. 3) In Belize, plans were under way to develop a protocol for improving the quality of harvested and stored peanuts. This effort was focusing on aflatoxin screening. An aflatoxin screening kit available in the U.S. was identified for use in the studies. Reorganization efforts at NCA&T and the departure of the principal investigator to another university has hampered progress on the project.

Focus

Post-harvest and marketing technologies


Lead scientist

Dr. Margaret Hinds
North Carolina A&T State University


Cooperators

A.F. Mendonca, NCA&T University
Dr. Curtis M. Jolly, Auburn University

CARDI Collaborators

Dr. J.I. Lindsey, Jamaica
Dr. A.K. Sinha, Belize