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Simulation of Peanut Cropping Systems to Improve Production Efficiency and Enhance Natural Resource Management. (UFL 13P)

Approach

The goal of UFL 13P was to use systems modeling to improve resource use efficiency in peanut production. The approach was to use field experiments to determine yield gaps, and to use peanut crop growth simulation to evaluate potential yields and to determine reasons for yield gaps. Models could be helpful to evaluate technology development, management strategies, and policy decisions to improve response to weather risks and maximize efficient use of natural resources and minimize negative environmental impact.

Achievements

Data on environmental conditions, including weather, soil, and crop growth data have been collected and have been used together with data from experiments to identify production constraints in order to adapt the PNUTGRO crop growth model to conditions in Ghana. Yield gap data has been accumulated to allow evaluation of production constraints. Soil fertility and disease problems are indicated as a major factor in loss of yield potential. Application of a combination of phosphorus + fungicide has resulted in doubling of yields, a result closely predicted by the CROPGRO-Peanut Model. Data on environmental conditions, including weather, soil, and crop growth data have been collected and have been used together with data from experiments to identify production constraints in order to adapt the PNUTGRO Crop Growth Model to conditions in Ghana. Good progress has been made. Yield losses due mainly to foliar diseases and lack of fertilizer, have been predicted relatively accurate with the PNUTGRO Model. Losses due to pests and diseases can be as high as 50-80%. Work is continuing to collect data that will allow the development of sub-models for PNUTGRO to predict aflatoxin risk and the development of Decision Support Systems for agricultural applications of climate forecasting, and risk/opportunity assessments in Ghana. A number of farmer field days and workshops have been conducted in Ghana and Benin, and farmers appear to very receptive to improved technologies. Extension aids have been developed and distributed, and the field days have had national television coverage. The project is collaborating with a NGO (Plan Ghana) to interact with women’s groups.

Focus

Producer Values


Lead Scientist

Dr. Kenneth J. Boote
University of Florida


Ghana Collaborator

Dr. Jesse Naab, Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Tamale

Benin Collaborator

Adomou Moustapha, Institut National des Recherches Agricoles du Bénin (INRAB), Cotonou