Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects. CAES News
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects.
Beneficial insects can prove useful for Georgia's greenhouse crops
While the use of beneficial insects and other biocontrols for agricultural pest management hasn’t gained widespread usage in open field production, some Georgia farmers are using natural control methods in greenhouse and high-tunnel production.
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers. CAES News
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers.
Better immunizations are key to healthier poultry flocks and a safer food supply
Like human infants, baby chicks are born without immunity to many common diseases. Immunizations are the answer, but it can be hard to immunize entire flocks of chickens in an efficient manner. That’s where poultry health specialists like Brian Jordan come in.
Grow It Know It Grant Coordinator Andie Bisceglia and VISTA member Joshua Truitt teach a soil lesson to students at the Center for Innovative Teaching in Winder, Georgia. CAES News
Grow It Know It Grant Coordinator Andie Bisceglia and VISTA member Joshua Truitt teach a soil lesson to students at the Center for Innovative Teaching in Winder, Georgia.
UGA students team with UGA Extension to expand Grow It Know It program
An award-winning interactive Clarke County school program that teaches students about science and nutrition is now underway in Barrow County, thanks to the University of Georgia.
University of Georgia scientists WenZhan Song, left, and Marc van Iersel are working together to tackle the issue of energy efficiency in controlled-environment agriculture. CAES News
University of Georgia scientists WenZhan Song, left, and Marc van Iersel are working together to tackle the issue of energy efficiency in controlled-environment agriculture.
President's Interdisciplinary Seed Grants help CAES researchers grow new partnerships
It might not seem like engineering and horticulture have much in common, but engineer WenZhan Song and horticulturist Marc Van Iersel are finding new ways to intertwine their respective fields thanks to the President's Interdisciplinary Seed Grant Program at the University of Georgia.
Georgia's Vidalia onion growers have finally planted this year's crop despite excessive rainfall in November and December that kept many producers out of the field. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onion growers have finally planted this year's crop despite excessive rainfall in November and December that kept many producers out of the field.
UGA onion agent tells Georgia farmers to be proactive with fungicides
Georgia’s Vidalia onion crop is planted and looks “promising,” according to Chris Tyson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s area onion agent, but he cautions producers to be proactive in managing onion diseases.
UGA CAES soil scientist Matt Levi devotes much of his time to improving Georgia's soil inventory by studying the soil profiles on farms across the state. CAES News
UGA CAES soil scientist Matt Levi devotes much of his time to improving Georgia's soil inventory by studying the soil profiles on farms across the state.
UGA soil scientist Matt Levi uses technology to help farmers, fellow researchers
University of Georgia soil scientist Matthew Levi is using technologies like digital soil mapping, spatial modeling and remote sensing to help his research colleagues and Georgia farmers improve their production practices.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
UGA poultry breeding program has wider implications for understanding human health
As far as poultry farmers are concerned, feed equals money. The more efficient chickens are at turning feed into thighs, breast and drumsticks, the healthier their bottom line. It turns out that the same science that can help poultry farmers raise more feed-efficient chickens could help people become healthier, too.
With the help of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Ratcliffe Scholarship Program, Jacqueline Kessler, a fourth-year environmental economics and management major, took an internship with the Environmental Law Institute remotely while participating in an exchange program in Pamplona, Spain. CAES News
With the help of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Ratcliffe Scholarship Program, Jacqueline Kessler, a fourth-year environmental economics and management major, took an internship with the Environmental Law Institute remotely while participating in an exchange program in Pamplona, Spain.
Ratcliffe Scholars program provides CAES students opportunities of a lifetime
Whether it’s seeing a historical garden firsthand, taking an internship out of state or making your first trip to a professional conference, experiences outside the classroom help students make the most of their time at college.
Dairy cows grazing in Oglethorpe County. CAES News
Dairy cows grazing in Oglethorpe County.
New CAES farm manager corrals livestock and staff on the farm
Managing one farm is a big job; managing a network of four teaching and research farms for the University of Georgia takes a different breed of farmer.