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All stages of fall armyworms, from tiny larvae to large caterpillars, live in a growth chamber on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. The worms are used to conduct research on how best to control the pest. CAES News
All stages of fall armyworms, from tiny larvae to large caterpillars, live in a growth chamber on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. The worms are used to conduct research on how best to control the pest.
Worm Army
Georgia farmers are never surprised to see fall armyworms munching on their precious corn, sorghum and forage hay crops. They just hope for a low number of armyworms. This year’s population of the tiny destroyers, described as an “Armageddon-type outbreak” by University of Georgia entomologist David Buntin, is far from low.
GM crops chart CAES News
GM crops chart
GMO Safety
Genetically modified foods are tested for safety testing before they reach the marketplace. It can take over a decade and cost tens of millions of dollars, and as a result, GMOs are the most safety-tested foods in history, says University of Georgia plant breeding and plant genetics expert Wayne Parrott.
Tim Grey, UGA weed scientist, speaks during the Plains field day held in 2014. CAES News
Tim Grey, UGA weed scientist, speaks during the Plains field day held in 2014.
Plains Field Day
An upcoming field day on Wednesday, Aug. 10, at the University of Georgia Southwest Georgia Research and Education Center (SWERC) in Plains, Georgia, will showcase cutting-edge agriculture research to farmers, UGA Cooperative Extension county agents and industry personnel.
Rows of forage sorghum regrowth after the first cutting. CAES News
Rows of forage sorghum regrowth after the first cutting.
Forage Sorghum
With water use and rising expenses a concern, forage sorghum is a cheaper, more effective alternative for Georgia cattlemen feeding dairy cows, according to University of Georgia animal and dairy scientist John Bernard.
Sugarcane aphids at various stages of development. CAES News
Sugarcane aphids at various stages of development.
Sugarcane Aphids
Sugarcane aphids have turned their back on their namesake and become a major pest for Georgia’s grain sorghum growers. The pest began infesting fields in the state two years ago and, last year, devastated farmers who chose not to apply spray controls, said University of Georgia small grains entomologist David Buntin.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015.
2016 Ag Forecast
Georgia’s economy will be on the rise in 2016, fueled by population growth, resurgence of the housing market and major projects across the state, including two new professional sports stadiums planned for metro Atlanta. Georgians can also expect to continue to pay less for a gallon of milk, and for meat producers, exports look encouraging for beef and pork.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages.
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
Ryegrass forage gets harvested the first of what could be three to four times. CAES News
Ryegrass forage gets harvested the first of what could be three to four times.
Nitrogen Deficiency
In light of recent wet weather, nitrogen deficiency problems have shown up in some small grains and ryegrass fields.
CAES News
Breeding resilience
Corn, wheat, rice and other modern cereals have been bred over the past centuries to produce as much grain as possible. However, to feed a growing population, plant breeders may have to coax out the raw survival traits of older and locally adapted plant varieties.
Corn tassels stretch toward the sun in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Corn tassels stretch toward the sun in a Spalding County, Ga., garden.
Organic grain production
There are about 1 million acres of certified organic grain and oil seed fields in the United States, but not many in Georgia. The growing demand for organic grains and seed oils in the southeast could change that. With several new potential mills that can handle organic grain coming on line in Georgia, there are new opportunities to enter this growing market.