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Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo. CAES News
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo.
Planting Conditions
Georgia farmers should expect dry weather when they plant their crops this spring, but Pam Knox, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences agricultural climatologist, anticipates an active tropical storm season in the Atlantic Ocean this summer.
Sandbags work to keep the sea at bay in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. University of Georgia scientist Craig Landry says there are places along the coast that are so at risk of eroding that they are pushed to embrace a "phased retreat."  Tourists could stop coming because of beach erosion and homeowners would sell because they can't afford insurance, or they are worried about losing their investment, he said. CAES News
Sandbags work to keep the sea at bay in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. University of Georgia scientist Craig Landry says there are places along the coast that are so at risk of eroding that they are pushed to embrace a "phased retreat."  Tourists could stop coming because of beach erosion and homeowners would sell because they can't afford insurance, or they are worried about losing their investment, he said.
Coastal Study
University of Georgia natural resource economist Craig Landry will use his portion of a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how the economy and the environment are affected when humans and coastal regions commingle. The four-year project is a team effort with researchers from Colorado, North Carolina and Ohio.
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply. CAES News
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply.
Upper Floridan Aquifer
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply.
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes.
Prevent Freeze Damage
Knowing wet bulb temperature could help farmers protect crops from hard freezes while saving money, water and energy.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease.
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
Sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field in this 2015 photo. CAES News
Sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field in this 2015 photo.
Watermelon Vine Protection
Whether protecting watermelons from the scalding summer sun or helping plants produce bigger fruit, maintaining healthy vines is a top priority for Georgia growers, especially when farm workers continuously pick from the same fruit bed.
As part of the LepNet project, Joe McHugh, professor of entomology at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and curator of the arthropod collection at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, will help lead the effort to digitize millions of butterfly and moth specimens now locked away in museum collections across the nation. CAES News
As part of the LepNet project, Joe McHugh, professor of entomology at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and curator of the arthropod collection at the Georgia Museum of Natural History, will help lead the effort to digitize millions of butterfly and moth specimens now locked away in museum collections across the nation.
Museum Collection Digitized
Locked in museums across the world, millions of insect specimens tell the story of the world’s climatic shifts, animals on the move and changing fauna.
Parts of north Georgia received between 10 and 15 inches of rain during August. CAES News
Parts of north Georgia received between 10 and 15 inches of rain during August.
August Climate
Rainfall in August reduced the area of extreme drought in northern Georgia. However, abnormally dry conditions and drought expanded in central and south Georgia, especially in coastal areas.
This summer has seen the second or third warmest June-July period on record for much of the state. Temperatures ranged from almost 2 to 3.5 degrees above the 1981-2010 average. CAES News
This summer has seen the second or third warmest June-July period on record for much of the state. Temperatures ranged from almost 2 to 3.5 degrees above the 1981-2010 average.
Too Hot, Too Dry
About 65 percent of Georgia is experiencing some level of abnormally dry weather or drought, and there are no signs it will break before October.