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Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia. CAES News
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia.
Forage Management
According to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest forage agronomist, an unusually wet winter will cause problems with summer forage crop quality in Georgia.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Georgia's Vidalia onion growers have finally planted this year's crop despite excessive rainfall in November and December that kept many producers out of the field. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onion growers have finally planted this year's crop despite excessive rainfall in November and December that kept many producers out of the field.
Onion Crop
Georgia’s Vidalia onion crop is planted and looks “promising,” according to Chris Tyson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s area onion agent, but he cautions producers to be proactive in managing onion diseases.
Peanuts being picked on the UGA Tifton campus on October 31, 2018. CAES News
Peanuts being picked on the UGA Tifton campus on October 31, 2018.
Peanut Crop
Three separate weather events this season will likely impact the quality and yield of a substantial amount of Georgia’s peanut acreage, according to Scott Monfort, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan agronomist.
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia. CAES News
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia.
Timber
The Georgia Forestry Commission estimates that 2.4 million acres of timber were damaged by Hurricane Michael. This equates to $763 million in direct losses.
Pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Yields
Georgia’s pecan growers will have a limited supply this year due to weather conditions that affected the quality of the pecans and Hurricane Michael’s impact, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Damage from Hurricane Michael in Tift County that impacted a pecan orchard. CAES News
Damage from Hurricane Michael in Tift County that impacted a pecan orchard.
Hurricane Michael Impact
To avoid losing their farms following Hurricane Michael, Georgia farmers need financial relief as soon as possible, according to Jeff Dorfman, a professor and agricultural economist in the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Prices
Despite a low supply of Georgia-grown pecans, Georgia producers are faced with lower prices for what remains of the pecan crop after Hurricane Michael. 
University of Georgia employees Eddie Edenfield (r) and Dennis Evans check readings at the UGA weather station on the campus in Griffin, Georgia. Eddenfield and Evans are responsible for making sure each of the network's 86 stations operate properly. CAES News
University of Georgia employees Eddie Edenfield (r) and Dennis Evans check readings at the UGA weather station on the campus in Griffin, Georgia. Eddenfield and Evans are responsible for making sure each of the network's 86 stations operate properly.
Life-Saving Data
The University of Georgia’s 86 weather stations record data 24 hours a day, seven days a week across Georgia. Farmers use this data to help them determine when to plant and treat their crops. During Hurricane Michael, the system helped the National Weather Service to track the storm and save lives.
Uprooted pecan tree in Tift County due to Hurricane Michael.

10-11-18 CAES News
Uprooted pecan tree in Tift County due to Hurricane Michael.

10-11-18
Ag Disaster Meeting
All farmers with crops and commodities affected by Hurricane Michael are invited to attend an agriculture disaster assistance information session to be held at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center at 2 p.m. Monday, October 22.