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August 8, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a tour of four northeast Georgia vineyards, focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia's burgeoning wine industry possible. CAES News
August 8, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a tour of four northeast Georgia vineyards, focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia's burgeoning wine industry possible.
Grape Growers
With the growth and increased marketability of the state’s wine industry, Athens, Georgia, is hosting new conferences that will focus on how to create quality fruit and turn it into a palatable beverage. The Southeastern Regional New Grape Growers Conference will be held at the University of Georgia’s South Milledge Greenhouse Complex in Athens on Dec. 11.
Cantaloupes being grown at UGA-Tifton. CAES News
Cantaloupes being grown at UGA-Tifton.
Cantaloupes
University of Georgia scientists are assisting in a study to find a cantaloupe variety with less netting on the rind in the hopes that the fruit will be less susceptible to the bacteria or pathogens that settle in the netting on the outside of the fruit.
When collecting wild raspberry seeds in Australia, University of Georgia scientist Rachel Itle first had to “calibrate” her eyes to search for the tiny, red berries. This, made finding them easier, but the wild berries were not plentiful. Some were bright red, some dull red and some golden, and the fruit is about a half or a fourth the size of commercial berries sold in the U.S., she said. CAES News
When collecting wild raspberry seeds in Australia, University of Georgia scientist Rachel Itle first had to “calibrate” her eyes to search for the tiny, red berries. This, made finding them easier, but the wild berries were not plentiful. Some were bright red, some dull red and some golden, and the fruit is about a half or a fourth the size of commercial berries sold in the U.S., she said.
New Fruit
University of Georgia horticulturists Rachel Itle and Dario Chavez recently travelled to Australia to collect seeds from wild raspberries and peaches to bring back to the UGA Griffin campus. As scientists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Itle and Chavez research Georgia-grown fruit.
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016. CAES News
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Horticulture's "Protected and Controlled Environment Horticulture" class, Candance Young and Donna Nevalainen, harvest vegetables from their high tunnel in December 2016.
Greenhouses and High Tunnels
From the miracle of December tomatoes to the marvel of fresh salad greens in space, greenhouses and growth chambers may play an increasing role in creating hyperlocal or hyperportable food systems.
Georgia strawberry farmers typically spray fungicides to control Botrytis and anthracnose (shown), two fungi that cause fruit rot. University of Georgia researchers are testing a mobile app, created by University of Florida scientists, that uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for diseases. CAES News
Georgia strawberry farmers typically spray fungicides to control Botrytis and anthracnose (shown), two fungi that cause fruit rot. University of Georgia researchers are testing a mobile app, created by University of Florida scientists, that uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for diseases.
Strawberry App
University of Georgia and University of Florida researchers are testing the Strawberry Advisory System in Georgia strawberry fields. SAS, an app created, in part, by UF plant pathologist Natalia Peres, uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for Botrytis and anthracnose, two fungi that cause fruit rot on strawberries.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird.
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Lowndes County Extension Coordinator Jacob Price looks at a Satsuma orange plant on a private farm in Lowndes County in 2015. CAES News
Lowndes County Extension Coordinator Jacob Price looks at a Satsuma orange plant on a private farm in Lowndes County in 2015.
Satsuma Oranges
Consumers with a sweet spot for satsuma oranges can expect to see south Georgia oranges on the market in 2017, according to Jacob Price, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent and Lowndes County Extension coordinator. That’s because south Georgia satsumas trees are a little more than a year away from producing fruit.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach.
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.
Here is a picture of a  peach tree orchard. CAES News
Here is a picture of a  peach tree orchard.
Peach Pest Management
University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen is concerned that Georgia peach growers can’t tell the difference between phony peach disease and weevil or nematode damage. A consequence could be that farmers unnecessarily destroy trees and potential fruit.
Pictured are three blackberry leaves that have Blackberry Yellow Vein Virus. CAES News
Pictured are three blackberry leaves that have Blackberry Yellow Vein Virus.
Blackberry Viruses
With no chemical treatments to kill viruses in blackberries, University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen recommends Georgia producers grow tissue-cultured plants.