Browse Controlling and Preventing Disease Stories

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Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers. CAES News
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers.
Poultry Health
Like human infants, baby chicks are born without immunity to many common diseases. Immunizations are the answer, but it can be hard to immunize entire flocks of chickens in an efficient manner. That’s where poultry health specialists like Brian Jordan come in.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
Metabolism Genetics
As far as poultry farmers are concerned, feed equals money. The more efficient chickens are at turning feed into thighs, breast and drumsticks, the healthier their bottom line. It turns out that the same science that can help poultry farmers raise more feed-efficient chickens could help people become healthier, too.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport.
Combatting Rural Stress
The challenges facing rural America today are diverse, and the answers to rural issues won’t come from a single expert or institution.
The research team, led by University of Georgia's Steven Stice and Augusta University's Nasrul Hoda, created a treatment called "AB126" using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells.  CAES News
The research team, led by University of Georgia's Steven Stice and Augusta University's Nasrul Hoda, created a treatment called "AB126" using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. 
Georgia Bio Awards
Two of five Georgia Bio Awards presented last month to University of Georgia faculty were programs either in or affiliated with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES).
University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical scientists have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models. Led by UGA Professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University, the team created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. The tiny tubular shape of an exosome allows EV therapy to cross barriers cells cannot. The exosomes, shown in the photo as small, red punctate clusters, are taken up by neurons, shown as green cell extensions surrounding a blue nucleus. CAES News
University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical scientists have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models. Led by UGA Professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University, the team created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. The tiny tubular shape of an exosome allows EV therapy to cross barriers cells cannot. The exosomes, shown in the photo as small, red punctate clusters, are taken up by neurons, shown as green cell extensions surrounding a blue nucleus.
Stroke Treatment
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical, a UGA startup company, have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain’s natural healing tendencies in animal models.
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells. CAES News
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells.
New Stroke Model
It is well-known in the medical field that the pig brain shares certain physiological and anatomical similarities with the human brain. So similar are the two that researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed the first U.S. pig model for stroke treatments...
A $20 million National Science Foundation grant funds the Engineering Research Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies (CMaT). The consortium is designed to hasten the development of advanced cell therapies for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer. CAES News
A $20 million National Science Foundation grant funds the Engineering Research Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies (CMaT). The consortium is designed to hasten the development of advanced cell therapies for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer.
CMaT Formed
Steven Stice to lead University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center researchers in consortium designed to hasten the development of advanced cell therapies for chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer.
This month, Michael Doyle retired from his position as director of the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
This month, Michael Doyle retired from his position as director of the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus.
Doyle Retires
Twenty-six years ago, the University of Georgia hired Mike Doyle to create and lead a research center focused on detecting, controlling and eliminating foodborne pathogens in America’s food supply. This month, Doyle retired from his position as director of the world-renowned Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus.
State Extension units, the Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF) office, and other agencies have several wildland fire resources for use in the southeastern region of the United States with a particular focus on rural wildland-urban interface (WUI) areas. CAES News
State Extension units, the Southern Regional Extension Forestry (SREF) office, and other agencies have several wildland fire resources for use in the southeastern region of the United States with a particular focus on rural wildland-urban interface (WUI) areas.
Wildfire Smoke
If you’ve walked outside during the last week, you’ve probably noticed the smell of smoke in the air. Wildfires associated with the current exceptional drought that is covering much of northern Georgia and surrounding states has created perfect conditions for the growth of these fires.
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection. CAES News
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection.
Zika Virus Research
A University of Georgia graduate student is using early stage chicken embryos to monitor the progression of the Zika virus. By collecting data on how the virus affects brain development, researchers at UGA can pinpoint the best treatments to stop or slow the progression of early-stage microcephaly, a rare birth defect linked to the Zika virus.