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University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018. CAES News
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018.
Pathogens’ Defense
When humans get sick, our immune systems kick into high gear. To help guard against disease, people are increasingly turning to antimicrobial agents — from soaps to wipes to hand sanitizers — to help kill germs. However, scientists have found that some strains of Salmonella pathogens have developed strategies to evade damage.
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus.
Source ID
A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport.
Combatting Rural Stress
The challenges facing rural America today are diverse, and the answers to rural issues won’t come from a single expert or institution.
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus. CAES News
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus.
Mosquito Season
Subtropical Storm Alberto has departed, and the rains will eventually subside. What happens next is predictable: mosquitoes.
Henk den Bakker is a food scientist with the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety, located on the UGA Griffin Campus. He received his master's degree in systematic biology, with a specialty in mycology and botany, from Leiden University in the Netherlands. His doctorate degree in mycology is from the National Herbarium of the Netherlands at Leiden University. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology and the Genetics Society of America. CAES News
Henk den Bakker is a food scientist with the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety, located on the UGA Griffin Campus. He received his master's degree in systematic biology, with a specialty in mycology and botany, from Leiden University in the Netherlands. His doctorate degree in mycology is from the National Herbarium of the Netherlands at Leiden University. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology and the Genetics Society of America.
Food Safety Bioinformatics
Food safety research usually involves analyzing live populations of foodborne pathogens like Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli, but University of Georgia food scientist Henk den Bakker fights pathogens by developing computer software. 
An array of food products CAES News
An array of food products
Store Food
As tropical storms and hurricanes pound the U.S. East Coast, homeowners listen closely to local weather broadcasts. Whether or not a record-breaking storm affects you, University of Georgia experts say that having an emergency food supply on hand is always a good idea.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach.
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.
The second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
The second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon.
Radon Testing
The University of Georgia Radon Education Program recommends testing your home for radon in recognition of National Radon Action Month in January.
PRIDE, Parents Reducing Injuries and Driver Error, is one of five programs selected for inclusion in a new national publication highlighting innovative programs that are effective in reducing teen driver crashes. The program, developed by the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, helps both parents and teenagers develop safe driving habits. CAES News
PRIDE, Parents Reducing Injuries and Driver Error, is one of five programs selected for inclusion in a new national publication highlighting innovative programs that are effective in reducing teen driver crashes. The program, developed by the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, helps both parents and teenagers develop safe driving habits.
Traffic Safety Grant
The University of Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute has been awarded a $642,900 grant from the Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety to continue its statewide education programs in the areas of child passenger safety, parent and teen driving safety and senior driver education.
UGA Extension has researched-based resources for those who want to raise backyard chickens. CAES News
UGA Extension has researched-based resources for those who want to raise backyard chickens.
Avian Influenza
The current highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 outbreak in the United States is a concern for the commercial poultry industry, not the general population, says a University of Georgia poultry expert. Humans won’t be infected with avian influenza by eating chicken or other poultry products. Nearly all previous cases of human infections with other avian influenza viruses involved close, direct contact with infected poultry, but little to no direct transmission from person to person. While the HPAI H5 virus has caused some severe devastation for the U.S. commercial poultry industry, there have been no reports of infections in humans, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from this virus to be low.