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Turkestan cockroach, Blatta lateralis, a cockroach species from Turkey has been recorded for the first time in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist Dan Suiter. Photo by Lisa Ames, UGA Cooperative Extension. CAES News
Turkestan cockroach, Blatta lateralis, a cockroach species from Turkey has been recorded for the first time in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist Dan Suiter. Photo by Lisa Ames, UGA Cooperative Extension.
New Roach
A new cockroach species from Turkey has been recorded for the first time in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist Dan Suiter.
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus. CAES News
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus.
Mosquito Season
Subtropical Storm Alberto has departed, and the rains will eventually subside. What happens next is predictable: mosquitoes.
Pesticide use is critical in controlling pests like thrips, whiteflies, aphids and beet armyworms. CAES News
Pesticide use is critical in controlling pests like thrips, whiteflies, aphids and beet armyworms.
Pesticide Training Changes
The way UGA Extension offers trainings, exams and continuing education classes for pesticide applicators’ license renewals will change in the coming months. This change will ensure that UGA Extension can continue to provide pesticide safety education throughout the state, while staying in line with changes mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons. CAES News
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons.
Fire Ant Treatments
Nothing ruins a good cookout or run through the sprinklers like a mound of fire ants. With warmer weather around the corner, early spring is the time to tackle fire ant problems before they spoil summer fun.
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions. CAES News
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions.
Mosquito Update
School is back in session in most parts of Georgia, and many families are returning to their normal routines. But less time chasing summertime adventures may mean more time consuming news and, unfortunately, new stories about the Zika virus.
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions. CAES News
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions.
West Nile Virus
With its shocking impact on babies and mothers, the Zika virus has gotten a lot of attention. However, some entomologists are looking at the current, abnormally dry weather and becoming concerned that another mosquito-borne illness could become a threat later this summer.
CAES News
Mosquito Season
Abnormally dry conditions this summer have kept Georgia’s mosquito populations mercifully low, but that’s no reason for Georgians to let down their guard this season.
Many Georgians are confusing the common wheel bug, which is beneficial in Georgia gardens, with the kissing bug, which made news earlier this fall. CAES News
Many Georgians are confusing the common wheel bug, which is beneficial in Georgia gardens, with the kissing bug, which made news earlier this fall.
Kissing Bugs
Over the last few weeks, many Georgians have focused their attention on the media-hyped coverage of the kissing bug. Much of the sensationalism and worry surrounding this insect boogieman is unwarranted, according to University of Georgia entomologists.
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons. CAES News
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons.
Ant Control
Fall is the best time to control fire ants, so start next year’s battle plan now. Fire ant colonies have been growing all summer and will have reached their peak size by the end of September. It is best to attack these colonies before cooler weather sends them deep into the ground.
The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, can be found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest if it gets to cotton fields and blueberry patches. CAES News
The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, can be found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest if it gets to cotton fields and blueberry patches.
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug
A University of Georgia entomologist is asking Georgians to help track an insect that loves to stowaway in homes and has the potential to hurt the state’s cotton and blueberry crops. The brown marmorated stink bug, a native of Asia, was first spotted in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1998 and has since been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. To date, it is classified as a nuisance pest in Georgia, but could quickly become an agricultural pest, too.