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Propane-fired turkey fryers on display in a sporting goods store in Macon, Georgia. CAES News
Propane-fired turkey fryers on display in a sporting goods store in Macon, Georgia.
Fried Turkeys
Frying a holiday turkey may sound like fun, but it can be tricky. Here are a few tips from University of Georgia experts to help make sure your bird is thoroughly cooked and your holiday doesn't include a trip to the emergency room or a call to the fire department.
Roasted turkey prepared for a holiday meal. CAES News
Roasted turkey prepared for a holiday meal.
Safe Holiday Bird
A perfectly cooked turkey on the table is the crowning jewel of a holiday feast. Some favorite tools for cooking turkeys include electric roaster ovens, grills, smokers and even deep fat fryers.
Tips for roasting, smoking or frying your turkey, provided by UGA Extension food safety expert Judy Harrison. CAES News
Tips for roasting, smoking or frying your turkey, provided by UGA Extension food safety expert Judy Harrison.
Turkey Cooking
It’s holiday turkey-eating time. Follow these tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to make sure you cook a tasty turkey while combating bacteria and other foodborne pathogens.
A team of food industry experts and grocery buyers selected 33 products to compete in the final round of the University of Georgia's 2016 Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest. A record-breaking 135 products were entered into the contest this year in 11 categories. CAES News
A team of food industry experts and grocery buyers selected 33 products to compete in the final round of the University of Georgia's 2016 Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest. A record-breaking 135 products were entered into the contest this year in 11 categories.
Flavor of Georgia 2016
Judges have selected 33 products to compete in the final round of the University of Georgia's 2016 Flavor of Georgia Food Product Contest March 14-15 at the Georgia Railroad Freight Depot in Atlanta.
To help reduce stress over the holidays, University of Georgia Extension experts say make lists and stick to them, just like these wise youngsters. Make lists of what to buy and where to buy those items and create a list of everything that needs to be done. Then attach a schedule for the coming weeks to break large tasks into smaller ones. CAES News
To help reduce stress over the holidays, University of Georgia Extension experts say make lists and stick to them, just like these wise youngsters. Make lists of what to buy and where to buy those items and create a list of everything that needs to be done. Then attach a schedule for the coming weeks to break large tasks into smaller ones.
Reducing Stress
There’s a huge buildup to the winter holidays. With so much happening, we have little time left to take care of ourselves, and physical and emotional resources may become depleted. Some stress can provide motivation to be productive, but too much stress can be detrimental to health and enjoyment of the season. To make this holiday less stressful and more enjoyable, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers the following tips.
A fried turkey is lifted from a pot of hot oil CAES News
A fried turkey is lifted from a pot of hot oil
Holiday Food Safety
One of the best ways to celebrate the holidays is to gather around the table to enjoy a delicious, home-cooked meal. Follow these simple recommendations to have a turkey feast that will be remembered for years to come, for all the right reasons.
CAES News
Healthy Holidays
While the holidays are often viewed as a time of inevitable weight gain, it’s possible to enjoy some of the same foods while still maintaining a healthy diet.
UGA food scientist Marilyn Erickson works in her laboratory in the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
UGA food scientist Marilyn Erickson works in her laboratory in the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia.
Cross-Contamination
In a recent study funded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, University of Georgia researchers found that produce containing bacteria are likely to contaminate other produce items through the continued use of knives or graters — the bacteria latches onto the utensils commonly found in consumers’ homes and spreads to the next item.
Pie pumpkin painted during workshop at UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Pie pumpkin painted during workshop at UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga.
Preserving Pumpkins
Pumpkins are a staple of fall-time cuisine and festivities. Whether canned, dried or pickled, there are some important tips to keep in mind when preserving this holiday favorite. Due to natural acidity levels, pumpkins require certain precautions be taken when canning in order to make preserves that are safe to eat.
University of Georgia food safety specialist Elizabeth Andress says canning your favorite recipe and giving it as a gift may be a very thoughtful present, but follow proper guidelines so you don't pass on a foodborne illness. CAES News
University of Georgia food safety specialist Elizabeth Andress says canning your favorite recipe and giving it as a gift may be a very thoughtful present, but follow proper guidelines so you don't pass on a foodborne illness.
Homemade Gifts
Many people are turning toward home canning as a way to show their loved ones how much they care during the holidays. While gifts from one’s own kitchen can mean a lot, it’s essential that the canner use the proper techniques so that everyone has a safe and healthy holiday season.