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University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Turfgrass Specialist Clint Waltz is currently using an “automower” on the lawn just outside the new UGA Turfgrass Research Facility on the UGA Griffin campus. The Husqvarna mower is on loan from Georgia sod producer Super-Sod, so Waltz can observe and evaluate the concept of “continual” mowing. CAES News
'Automower'
If you dread mowing the lawn, a new battery-operated mower, much like the popular Rumba vacuum cleaner, may be the product of your dreams. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Turfgrass Specialist Clint Waltz is reviewing it.
Patrick McCullough, UGA Extension weed specialist, was among the scientists who shared their findings at the UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day held on Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. McCullough is shown telling visitors the results of his study on bluegrass control in Bermuda grass. CAES News
Turfgrass Updates
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day, held Aug. 9 on the UGA Griffin campus, provided research-based information about the production and management of turfgrass from UGA scientists and UGA Extension specialists.
Argentine ants feeds on Terro liquid bait CAES News
Insect ID
Have you ever spotted a bug in your house and not known what it was? The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) hosts annual integrated pest management (IPM) workshops focused on the home to help pest control operators identify and manage household pests.
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky,' have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators. CAES News
Pollinator Census
The bees and other pollinators that fuel Georgia agriculture are crucial to the state’s economy, but no one really knows how many there are. In honor of National Honey Day, August 18, UGA Cooperative Extension is announcing an ambitious plan to gauge the size and effect of the state’s pollinator population.
At 75, Frank Williams is retired from his position as the groundskeeper for the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia. But he still works there three days a week and he hasn't slowed down a bit. CAES News
Williams Honored
After more than 30 years, Frank Williams has retired from his position as the groundskeeper for the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden (CGBG) at the Historic Bamboo Farm, but he still works there three days a week. Even at 75, he hasn’t slowed down.
A diseased leaf on a tree at the University of Georgia's Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Ga. CAES News
Turf & Ornamentals
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day is set for Thursday, Aug. 9, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. This year, two optional, interactive sessions especially designed for landscape experts will follow the field day.
University of Georgia blueberry scientist Scott NeSmith has to keep birds away from his blueberry crop so that he can research and breed new varieties for Georgia growers. His latest trick — using a dancing, inflatable tube man to scare the birds — may lead passersby to believe that the UGA Griffin campus is selling cars. CAES News
Wacky Scarecrow
Farmers have used scarecrows to keep birds away from field crops for more than 3,000 years. University of Georgia blueberry scientist Scott NeSmith uses a dancing, inflatable tube man to scare the birds away from his research plants.
Beekeeper and bees at the UGA Bee Laboratory on the university's Horticulture Research Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Honeybee 101
There are many bee look-alikes in the insect world. One way to distinguish a bee from other insects is to learn some bee biology.
Switchgrass CAES News
Biofuel Crops
A research team led by the University of Georgia has discovered that manipulation of the same gene in poplar trees and switchgrass produced plants that grow better and are more efficiently converted to biofuels.
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Fire Ant Control
Bait treatment should be applied in southern and central Georgia in April and October to eliminate existing fire ant colonies and their mounds, but reinvasion can occur any time, according to University of Georgia entomologist Will Hudson. Four to six months later, the mounds will reappear, which means homeowners should treat for the pests twice a year, about six months apart.