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Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus. CAES News
Mosquito Season
Subtropical Storm Alberto has departed, and the rains will eventually subside. What happens next is predictable: mosquitoes.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say removing your shoes before going indoors can reduce the amount of pollen you track into your home. Other ways to reduce the amount of pollen indoors include wiping your pets' paws before allowing them to come inside and cleaning floors and surfaces often. CAES News
Indoor Pollen
Are your sinuses clogged? Do you feel like you are walking in a sea of yellow dust? Have you washed your car three times this week? Welcome to pollen season in Georgia.
As a result of a roof leak, mold grows on the ceiling of a home. CAES News
Fight Mold
Hurricane Irma had slowed down by the time she reached Georgia, reducing the amount of expected structural damage to homes, but flood waters may have left behind a sneaky and dangerous after-effect: mold.
High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Hurricane Preparedness
Hurricane Irma strengthened to a Category 5 storm with sustained winds of 175 mph as of Monday, Sept. 5. It’s moving west-northwest on its present track, but longer-term models project that it will make a sharp turn to the north later this week, which could threaten parts of the Southeast, including Georgia.
When a weather emergency is expected, more shopped rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
Emergency Food
As hurricane season arrives, Georgians are listening closely to local weather broadcasts. Whether or not a record-breaking storm affects you, University of Georgia experts say having an emergency food supply on hand is always a good idea.
Pesticide use is critical in controlling pests like thrips, whiteflies, aphids and beet armyworms. CAES News
Pesticide Training Changes
The way UGA Extension offers trainings, exams and continuing education classes for pesticide applicators’ license renewals will change in the coming months. This change will ensure that UGA Extension can continue to provide pesticide safety education throughout the state, while staying in line with changes mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
Don't let fire ants ruin your summer afternoons. CAES News
Fire Ant Treatments
Nothing ruins a good cookout or run through the sprinklers like a mound of fire ants. With warmer weather around the corner, early spring is the time to tackle fire ant problems before they spoil summer fun.
Rabun County farmer Terri Jagger Blincoe receives the ceremonial “key” to a tiny house funded by Georgia Organics and built by students in UGA's course on “Green Building and the Tiny House Movement.” Georgia Organics Executive Director Alice Rolls, far left, UGA student Emma Courson and UGA associate professor of horticulture David Berle congratulate her. CAES News
Latest Tiny House
It’s only 175 square feet, but it’s cozy, clean and makes all the difference in the world to a young farmer who is learning to work the land.
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions. CAES News
Mosquito Update
School is back in session in most parts of Georgia, and many families are returning to their normal routines. But less time chasing summertime adventures may mean more time consuming news and, unfortunately, new stories about the Zika virus.
While many of Georgia's 63 species of mosquito thrive in wet weather, southern house mosquitoes — which transmit West Nile virus — prefer dry or even drought conditions. CAES News
West Nile Virus
With its shocking impact on babies and mothers, the Zika virus has gotten a lot of attention. However, some entomologists are looking at the current, abnormally dry weather and becoming concerned that another mosquito-borne illness could become a threat later this summer.