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UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day. CAES News
Using Pesticides Wisely
A state program aimed at teaching farmers and other pesticide applicators how to properly apply pesticides continues to limit pesticide drift in Georgia. The educational training system, called “Using Pesticides Wisely,” was created by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture. UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper, who developed the training, credits Georgia farmers’ excellent teamwork and decision-making for the low number of pesticide drift complaints in Georgia in 2017.
Peanuts being picked on the UGA Tifton campus on October 31, 2018. CAES News
Peanut Crop
Three separate weather events this season will likely impact the quality and yield of a substantial amount of Georgia’s peanut acreage, according to Scott Monfort, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan agronomist.
Damage from Hurricane Michael in Tift County that impacted a pecan orchard. CAES News
Hurricane Michael Impact
To avoid losing their farms following Hurricane Michael, Georgia farmers need financial relief as soon as possible, according to Jeff Dorfman, a professor and agricultural economist in the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
Uprooted pecan tree in Tift County due to Hurricane Michael.

10-11-18 CAES News
Ag Disaster Meeting
All farmers with crops and commodities affected by Hurricane Michael are invited to attend an agriculture disaster assistance information session to be held at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus Conference Center at 2 p.m. Monday, October 22.
Peanut harvest will be delayed this year because of Hurricane Michael and the damage to buying points and shellers in South Georgia. CAES News
Georgia Peanut Crop
Georgia peanut farmers, still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Michael on October 10-11, are facing uncertainty about when and where to unload their crop after harvest, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort.
High winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground. CAES News
Georgia Cotton Crop
What was an extremely promising Georgia cotton crop was devastated when Hurricane Michael ravaged south Georgia Oct. 10-11. According to Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist, the prospects of 1,500 to 1,800 pounds of dryland cotton for some producers were reduced, resulting in 80 to 90 percent losses in some fields.
Peanuts growing at the Lang Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017. CAES News
Irrigating Peanuts
Georgia peanut farmers can save money, conserve water and produce higher yields using a new irrigation scheduling recommendation, according to Wesley Porter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Turfgrass Specialist Clint Waltz is currently using an “automower” on the lawn just outside the new UGA Turfgrass Research Facility on the UGA Griffin campus. The Husqvarna mower is on loan from Georgia sod producer Super-Sod, so Waltz can observe and evaluate the concept of “continual” mowing. CAES News
'Automower'
If you dread mowing the lawn, a new battery-operated mower, much like the popular Rumba vacuum cleaner, may be the product of your dreams. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Turfgrass Specialist Clint Waltz is reviewing it.
Peanut comparison of healthy peanuts vs. peanuts infected with white mold disease in 2017. CAES News
Peanut Crop
Plant diseases, like leaf spot and white mold, are forcing Georgia peanut farmers to consider moving their harvest times up a few days, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort.
Whiteflies on a cotton plant in a lab on the UGA Tifton campus.
August 24, 2018 CAES News
Whitefly Management
Georgia cotton farmers who planted their crop late this year need to be mindful of potential whitefly pressure, according to Phillip Roberts, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension entomologist.