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Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies. CAES News
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies.
Ant Queens
In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that’s not always the way ant societies function.
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year. CAES News
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year.
Citrus Crop
The citrus greening disease that has devastated Florida’s industry over the past decade is not affecting Georgia production, but growers should still be aware of the potential danger it can bring, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day. CAES News
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day.
PSO Awards
Eight University of Georgia faculty and staff were honored for exemplary service to the state during Monday’s 2019 Public Service and Outreach awards luncheon, which included awards for Entrepreneur of the Year and Donor Impact.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Pecan Pest
Ambrosia beetles are swarming south Georgia pecan orchards and farmers should take precautions now, according to Angel Acebes-Doria, pecan entomologist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood CAES News
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood
Spring Ant Control
Whether you have a well-manicured lawn or a wild preserve, almost every landscape in Georgia shares one feature: fire ants.
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects. CAES News
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects.
Nature's Helpers
While the use of beneficial insects and other biocontrols for agricultural pest management hasn’t gained widespread usage in open field production, some Georgia farmers are using natural control methods in greenhouse and high-tunnel production.
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. Blueberry farmers are wary of a late season freeze and its impact on this year's crop. CAES News
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. Blueberry farmers are wary of a late season freeze and its impact on this year's crop.
IPM Grant
The University of Georgia has been awarded a $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop organic methods of controlling the Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD). 
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day. CAES News
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day.
Using Pesticides Wisely
A state program aimed at teaching farmers and other pesticide applicators how to properly apply pesticides continues to limit pesticide drift in Georgia. The educational training system, called “Using Pesticides Wisely,” was created by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture. UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper, who developed the training, credits Georgia farmers’ excellent teamwork and decision-making for the low number of pesticide drift complaints in Georgia in 2017.
Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet. CAES News
Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet.
Palmer Amaranth Management
Georgia farmers scored what many view as a significant victory when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency extended the registration of the controversial weed killer dicamba for two years. The herbicide can be used for over-the-top weed control in cotton and soybean fields, according to Stanley Culpepper, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist.
A Joro spider found in Hoschton, Georgia in 2018. CAES News
A Joro spider found in Hoschton, Georgia in 2018.
Joro Spiders
If northeast Georgia yards seem a little extra spooky this Halloween season, there’s a good reason. They may have a little extra help from a new neighbor who is really into those cobweb decorations.