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Live the life of a pioneer through Rock Eagle Saturday program

You can spend the morning of March 15 living the life of a pioneer at Rock Eagle 4-H Center through the Saturday at the Rock program.

This session will meet at the center’s historic Scott Site where participants will roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty and work on the early 1900’s-era homestead. Activities will include cutting shingles from tree rounds with a froe and maul, shaving wood with a drawknife, sawing trees with a cross-cut saw, using a spoon gauge to create a bowl and more.

Wearing period attire, Rock Eagle’s guide will also lead a tour of the site including the saddlebag farmhouse, the blacksmith shop, the smokehouse, the chicken coop, the outhouse and gardens. Visitors will also be allowed to use simple machines and tools from the turn of the century.

This program runs from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and includes admission to Rock Eagle’s Diane Davies Natural History Museum. The session is appropriate for all ages and costs $5 per person.

Advanced registration is required. For more information or to register, call Laura Kent at (706) 484-2881 or email her at lmkent@uga.edu.

Different programs take place each month, excluding December. A complete list of Saturday at the Rock sessions may be found online at www.rockeagle4h.org/ee/community/SaturdayattheRock.html.

Froe and maul
Froe and maul

In pioneer days, the froe was used to split off pieces from a log and the maul was used to drive the froe into the wood. The froe had a couple of dozen other names as well, including "riving ax." Depending on how large and long the log was, everything from withes to shakes and shingles were made.

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In pioneer days, the froe was used to split off pieces from a log and the maul was used to drive the froe into the wood. The froe had a couple of dozen other names as well, including "riving ax." Depending on how large and long the log was, everything from withes to shakes and shingles were made. Download Image
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