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Squash Struggles Best bet for squash-growing is to plant resistant varieties and take a break in the height of summer. Published May 24, 2017Author:

Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Winter Squash Winter squash are harvested when mature and can be kept in storage for months. Published May 24, 2017Author:

By determining the varieties best suited for the area, University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash. He has found that Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins, as well as Choctaw and 'Thelma Sanders' sweet potato squashes, hold up best against squash pests and diseases.

Snake Season Snakes are a vital part of the Georgia ecosystem, but they need their space. Published May 24, 2017Author:

Not many animals elicit the extreme emotional response that snakes do, but the truth is they’re an ordinary part of the landscape in Georgia.

'Inferno' Coleus Gardeners looking to add "wow" factor to their landscape should give 'Inferno' coleus a try. Published May 18, 2017Author:

There is an ‘Inferno’ of color this spring coming from a coleus that racked up quite a number of perfect scorecards. ‘Inferno’ hasn’t been out long, but already it has heads turning, especially when you consider that it was total perfection in University of Georgia, University of Tennessee and Michigan State University trials.

Room to Grow Aerification helps turfgrass green-up, lets air and moisture get to root zone. Published May 18, 2017Author:

Last year many lawns across the state didn’t receive enough rainfall for the grass to grow, photosynthesize and make carbohydrate reserves. Turfgrass that experienced this lack of rainfall will likely be slow to green up this spring. If rainfall totals return to normal this spring, lawns will recover, but they may do so at a slower rate because the production of reserves was compromised last fall. For example, a lawn that would typically be fully green and growing in mid-May might take until late May or June to green up. A two- to four-week delay in green-up of warm-season grasses may be common this spring.

Congressional Fellows CAES students learn the ropes in Washington, D.C., through Congressional Agricultural Fellows program. Published May 17, 2017Author:

Seven University of Georgia students studying in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have embarked on the opportunity of a lifetime — serving as Congressional Agricultural Fellows in Washington, D.C.

Cotton Irrigation UGA Extension physiologist John Snider recommends farmers use sensor-based irrigation scheduling. Published May 17, 2017Author:

Decreasing irrigation for cotton crops during the early season may not affect yields and could save growers more than 54,000 gallons of water per acre, according to University of Georgia researchers.

Layby Herbicide Program Layby equipment needed to effectively control weeds in corn that can get as high as 14 feet tall. Published May 16, 2017Author:

Layby herbicide programs allow Georgia field corn growers to better control weeds throughout the growing season, according to Brooke Jeffries, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Wheeler County, Georgia.

Borlaug Fellowship Daniel Mwalwayo has spent most of his professional career working to ensure a safe food supply in his home country of Malawi. Published May 15, 2017Author: 5FF4

Daniel Mwalwayo has spent most of his professional career working to ensure a safe food supply in his home country of Malawi.

New Food Trends Locally sourced scone and muffin hybrid takes top prize at Georgia 4-H's 2017 Food Product Development Contest. Published May 15, 2017Author:

Vegan marshmallows, dairy-free cheese crackers and locally sourced baked treats — the highlights of Georgia 4-H’s 2017 Food Product Development Contest read like a list of top food trends of 2017. Inspired by the dietary needs and interests of their friends and neighbors, three teams of Georgia 4-H’ers met at the University of Georgia Department of Food Science and Technology in Athens, Georgia, last week to showcase their newly developed food products.


About the Newswire

Formerly referred to as FACES, our media newswire continues to feature stories from the CAES news team relating to family, agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences, as well as UGA Extension news.

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