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Gardening show includes tour and hands-on lessons

On this week’s episode of "Gardening in Georgia," airing June 28 and 30, host Walter Reeves has a range of informative botanical activities planned. Join him for an unobtrusive visit to an Athens nursery, a lesson on rose latticework construction, and tips on how to change the color of your hydrangeas.

"Gardening in Georgia" can be seen each Thursday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 12:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Georgia Public Broadcasting stations.

Retired University of Georgia Extension agent Reeves was once an agricultural novice, although his expertise as a gardening guru makes that concept hard to fathom. If you are new to gardening, you may find nursery visits daunting. The many varieties of plants can be overwhelming to a beginner. Reeves pays a visit to Cofer's Lawn and Garden to talk with Tony Brown, who has advice on taking the edge off your first few trips to the garden center.

Reeves proves once again that he can produce maximum results with minimum supplies, namely, some wood and copper pipe. He uses these materials to craft a rose trellis. This project may require some note-taking if you wish to recreate it in future trellis assembly endeavors of your own.

Do you prefer your hydrangeas pink or blue? Reeves gives you the power to choose by soil manipulation with common chemicals. He'll tell you how to make the soil sweet or sour, which determines the bloom's color. Only a small number of flowers, including hydrangeas, can be altered chromatically by soil chemical content.

GPB and the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences coproduce "Gardening in Georgia." The 2007 season is underwritten by McCorkle Nurseries with support from the Metro Atlanta Landscape and Turf Association.

For more information on "Gardening in Georgia," see the show’s web site at www.gardeningingeorgia.com.

(Katherine Tippins is a student writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)

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