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Weeds, sagos, cannas and day lilies on 'Gardening'

By Katherine Tippins
University of Georgia

On "Gardening in Georgia" July 26 and 28, host Walter Reeves identifies weeds, learns the difference between male and female sago palms and splits cannas and day lilies.

Reeves is a retired University of Georgia Extension agent and author of four books on gardening. "Gardening in Georgia" airs on Georgia Public Broadcasting each Thursday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 12:30 and 6:30 p.m.

Discerning which weeds you're battling is the best defense against them. This knowledge allows you to rid your garden of a particular weed efficiently. Reeves determines different types of weeds by identifying their seedheads. You may want to take notes and do your own seedhead sleuthing.

Sago palms aren't actually palms. They're found often in the landscapes of south Georgia. Rog Ditmer at The Cloister, a resort on Sea Island, schools Walter in detecting the gender of sagos. During the lesson, they discover scale insects destroying the plant.

If you don't want to wait around for your plants to spread slowly, split them and replant the offshoots. Splitting your plants is a simple way to increase their value and expand your garden.

Cannas and daylilies are among the easiest plants to dig and divide. Walter gets some tips on doing this from Sheldon Fleming at Wonderland Gardens.

The 2007 season of "Gardening in Georgia" is made possible through an underwriting gift from McCorkle Nurseries and support from the Metro Atlanta Landscape and Turf Association. To learn more about the show, visit www.gardeningingeorgia.com.

(Katherine Tippins is a student writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)

(Katherine Tippins is a student writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)

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