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Pest management class for small growers set for UGA Griffin Campus

A workshop for small-scale vegetable farmers and home gardeners interested in using integrated pest management techniques is set for Friday, Sept. 19 on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a science-based decision making process that uses biological, mechanical, cultural and chemical methods to control pests. IPM also aims to minimize economic, environmental and public health risks associated with pests and pest management practices.

IPM can be used in both agricultural and non-agricultural settings, such as homes, gardens and workplaces.

The class will cover ways to troubleshoot problems vegetable growers face in commercial gardens. Disease, insect and cultural issues will be covered as well as organic and non-organic practices and solutions. Participants will learn the importance of insect identification, as well as how to protect beneficial insects, control weeds, solve cultural problems and grow a healthier crop.

Instructors will include UGA entomologist Kris Braman, UGA horticulturist Bob Westerfield and UGA plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, all members of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences faculty. Spalding County Extension agent Wade Hutcheson, University of Tennessee entomologist Frank Hale and Alabama Extension entomologist Ayanava Majumdar will also lead sections of the workshop.

Participants can receive five hours of commercial pesticide credit in category 21 and one hour of private pesticide credit for completing the workshop.

The workshop will be held from 8 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. in room 104 of the Student Learning Center on the UGA Griffin Campus located off Experiment Street in Griffin. The cost of the workshop is $20, which includes all materials, lunch and break refreshments.

Register online at tinyurl.com/veggietroubleshooting. For more information or to register, call Beth Horne at (770) 228-7214 or email her at bhorne@uga.edu.

Biological control
Biological control

Wasp eggs travel on a hornworm that has been parasitized by the wasp and is now used as a host for the wasp's eggs. This is an example of a beneficial insect, the wasp, being used to control a tomato pest in a vegetable garden.

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Wasp eggs travel on a hornworm that has been parasitized by the wasp and is now used as a host for the wasp's eggs. This is an example of a beneficial insect, the wasp, being used to control a tomato pest in a vegetable garden. Download Image
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