Commodity Teams

Commodity websites

Our teams made up of research scientists and extension specialists work together to provide the latest technology and information for efficient, profitable production of some of Georgia's most valuable commodities.


Cross-commodity programs

Many of our research and extension faculty work in multi-disciplinary teams and roles that affect more than one specific commodity or research area. There are many resources available that can be applied across disciplines and production areas. 


Commodity news:

John Ruter, Allan M. Armitage Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, was named UGA’s 2021 Inventor of the Year, recognizing his many years of work developing and testing new ornamental plant cultivars, many of which are sold commercially and adorn landscapes around the country. (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski) CAES News
John Ruter, Allan M. Armitage Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, was named UGA’s 2021 Inventor of the Year, recognizing his many years of work developing and testing new ornamental plant cultivars, many of which are sold commercially and adorn landscapes around the country. (Photo by Dorothy Kozlowski)
Master gardener: John Ruter talks ornamental plant breeding
John Ruter realized at a young age that he belonged in a garden. He came to UGA in 1990 to serve as the nursery crop research specialist at the Tifton Campus after earning bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. degrees in horticulture from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, the University of Tennessee and the University of Florida, respectively. He now serves as the Allan M. Armitage Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, specializing in ornamental plant breeding and production.
Tomato lovers will attest that homegrown always tastes best, even if they don't always win beauty contests. CAES News
Tomato lovers will attest that homegrown always tastes best, even if they don't always win beauty contests.
Too much love can ruin the chances of growing perfect summer tomatoes
During the summer growing season, the love many have for a homegrown tomato approaches obsession. In fact, some people love tomatoes so much that they struggle to grow them — because they give their plants too much care.
Beekeepers participated in the annual UGA-Young Harris Beekeeping Institute on the campus of Young Harris College in 2018. The event features a wide array of lectures from world-renowned bee scientists, honey-judging events and beekeeper-training workshops. CAES News
Beekeepers participated in the annual UGA-Young Harris Beekeeping Institute on the campus of Young Harris College in 2018. The event features a wide array of lectures from world-renowned bee scientists, honey-judging events and beekeeper-training workshops.
1000th Certified Master Beekeeper and counting
After two decades of participants from 22 states and two countries, the Georgia Master Beekeeper Program has just welcomed its 1,000th participant.
UGA Extension consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield checks bean plants for signs of disease and insects on the UGA campus in Griffin. Westerfield grows vegetables at work to be prepared to answer home gardener questions. He grows them at home for his dinner table. CAES News
UGA Extension consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield checks bean plants for signs of disease and insects on the UGA campus in Griffin. Westerfield grows vegetables at work to be prepared to answer home gardener questions. He grows them at home for his dinner table.
Unusually cool spring temperatures may impede Georgia vegetable gardens
To call this past spring in Georgia normal would be a mischaracterization. Typical springs in Georgia seem to last about three days — and then we hit the hot weather. This spring, the cooler temperatures were most pleasant and hung on through the middle of May. Rainfall has also been feast or famine, and wind patterns have been higher than normal. Together, these conditions have made for a challenging time in the vegetable garden.

Upcoming commodity-related events:

Event is FREE, but pre-registration is required.  
Jun 25
9:00AM - 12:00PM Virtual Corn Silage and Stored Forage Field Day
Managing environmental stresses in the landscape Dr. Mengmeng Gu, Texas A &M University Plants in landscapes may or may not encounter diseases or insect issues, but they are very likely exposed to one or more types of environmental stresses, also known as abiotic stresses. Environmental stresses may include temperature stresses (both high and low temperatures), air quality (e.g. air pollution and gas leaks), water stresses (too much and not enough), light levels (too much and not enough), fertility, and of course soil conditions. Some of these factors are interconnected, and thus complicated. This presentation hopes to elucidate these abiotic stresses in landscapes for cost-effective landscape management.    Disease management in ornamentals Dr. Jean Willian-Woodward, Dept. of Plant Pathology, Univesity of Georgia Jean will talk about the major disease issues and their biological information on o
Jul 15
3:00PM - 5:00PM GTPOB Green Webinar Series Session 4 https://ugaurbanag.com/
What should you do if you have a pesticide accident? Dr. Mickey Taylor, Dept. of Entomology, University of Georgia This webinar will help you recognize the hazards you and your fellow workers face when handling and applying pesticides. You will be able to differentiate the types of harmful effects associated with pesticide exposure and relate the hazard classification system & its corresponding signal words to the personal protective equipment you must wear according to the pesticide’s label. Finally, we will discuss how you should respond to a pesticide spill and how to use the three Cs (control, contain, and clean-up) to manage all sizes of pesticide spills.   Managing ambrosia beetles in nurseries and landscape plantings Dr. Will Hudson, Dept. of Entomology, University of Georgia The speaker will cover the biology of the beetles, seasonal timing, trapping, and factors known to increase susceptibility in plant material.  Also, current management options for the ambrosia beetle problem in the landscape will be discussed.
Sep 16
3:00PM - 5:00PM GTPOB Green Webinar Series Session 5 https://ugaurbanag.com/
Current research and general management of Imported fire ants in nurseries Dr. Jason Oliver, Dept. of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, Tennessee State University The talk will cover basic imported fire ant management techniques for nursery, landscape, and turfgrass sites and will provide information on the latest research to develop new and more practical treatments for fire ant quarantine certification in commercial nurseries.   The worst weeds in the landscape and how to control them Dr. Mark Czarnota, Dept. of Horticulture, University of Georgia Weed control starts with proper identification; Dr. Czarnota will cover the most troublesome landscape weeds and discuss the best strategies for cultural and chemical control.
Nov 18
11/18 3:00PM - 11/19 5:00PM GTPOB Green Webinar Series Session 6 https://ugaurbanag.com/
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Keep checking this space for upcoming events!


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