Dan Suiter is a UGA Extension entomologist based on the university's Griffin campus. He directs the structural pest management program and was recently named the chair of the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture Faculty Advisory Committee. CAES News
Dan Suiter is a UGA Extension entomologist based on the university's Griffin campus. He directs the structural pest management program and was recently named the chair of the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture Faculty Advisory Committee.
Dan Suiter to lead programming at UGA Center for Urban Agriculture
University of Georgia Entomology Professor Dan Suiter has been named the chair of the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture Faculty Advisory Committee.
As the students at UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences start the fall semester, the 2019 CAES Ambassadors are ready to represent the college at college fairs and alumni events and help with logistics at college events. CAES News
As the students at UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences start the fall semester, the 2019 CAES Ambassadors are ready to represent the college at college fairs and alumni events and help with logistics at college events.
CAES Ambassadors gear up for another year of service
Nearly 40 University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Ambassadors are ready to welcome back students, faculty and staff for another school year on both the Athens and Tifton campuses.
The Georgia 4-H Foundation has reached its fundraising goal for the restoration of the Rock Eagle Chapel, which was damage by fire in February. CAES News
The Georgia 4-H Foundation has reached its fundraising goal for the restoration of the Rock Eagle Chapel, which was damage by fire in February.
Prominent Atlanta business leader helps Georgia 4-H reach goal for iconic chapel restoration
A generous $200,000 gift from a prominent 4-H alumna and an outpouring of support at the 2019 4-H Gala catapulted the fundraising effort to rebuild the Rock Eagle Chapel at the Rock Eagle 4-H Center past its $400,000 goal on Aug. 10.
As of Aug. 1, Professor Jeffrey Dorfman is serving as the state fiscal economist of Georgia. CAES News
As of Aug. 1, Professor Jeffrey Dorfman is serving as the state fiscal economist of Georgia.
UGA’s Dorfman to provide in-depth economic forecasts, modeling as state fiscal economist
For three decades, University of Georgia students have relied on Professor Jeffrey Dorfman to help them apply sound economic reasoning to the world outside their classroom. As of Aug. 1, Dorfman is applying that economic reasoning to real-world problems and situations in the policy arena as the state fiscal economist of Georgia.
When cows are exposed to a temperature-humidity index above 68, their milk production begins to decrease. UGA animal and dairy scientists are searching for ways to ease heat stress and improve dairy productivity. CAES News
When cows are exposed to a temperature-humidity index above 68, their milk production begins to decrease. UGA animal and dairy scientists are searching for ways to ease heat stress and improve dairy productivity.
UGA-Tifton conducts research to help dairy cattle deal with heat stress
Georgia’s summer heat can make it hard to do almost anything outside and, for dairy cows, that includes producing milk. Heat stress is inevitable in the Southeast U.S., and the first week of August had temperatures soaring past 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
UGA Extension is looking for citizen scientist to help with the first-ever statewide census of pollinators, the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, on Aug. 23-24. CAES News
UGA Extension is looking for citizen scientist to help with the first-ever statewide census of pollinators, the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, on Aug. 23-24.
Help needed with Great Georgia Pollinator Census Aug. 23-24 at UGA-Athens
With just 15 minutes and proximity to any blooming plant, Georgians can help University of Georgia Cooperative Extension researchers gain a clearer picture of pollinator health across our state.
Bermuda grass stem maggot damages the upper leaves of a forage crop. Lisa Baxter estimates about 60% yield loss in this picture. CAES News
Bermuda grass stem maggot damages the upper leaves of a forage crop. Lisa Baxter estimates about 60% yield loss in this picture.
Drought changes management strategy for Bermuda grass stem maggot
Drought-like conditions this summer are forcing Georgia forage farmers to delay treatments for Bermuda grass stem maggot, according to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension forage specialist.
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky. CAES News
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky.
Beuchat, Diez honored by International Association for Food Protection
Two University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences food scientists have been presented awards of excellence from the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP). Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat and Professor Francisco Diez were recognized at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24 in Louisville, Kentucky.
A corn plot grows for research at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue managing their weeds even after corn is harvested this year. CAES News
A corn plot grows for research at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue managing their weeds even after corn is harvested this year.
After corn harvests, farmers should continue managing weeds
Georgia corn farmers are preparing for harvest, but they can’t take a break once they ship their crops to market. That time should be focused on staying ahead of weeds that can cripple the next year’s crop.