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UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes.
Sketchy Weather
Georgia weather is predictably unpredictable, bitter cold one week and balmy the next. For that reason, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts urge Georgia growers to pay close attention to the weather over the coming months and be prepared to use irrigation for frost protection and potential dry conditions as we move into spring.
Assistant Professor Yukiko Hashida recently joined the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. She uses her background in international law and finance to inform her research into natural resource economics. CAES News
Assistant Professor Yukiko Hashida recently joined the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. She uses her background in international law and finance to inform her research into natural resource economics.
Environmental Economics
Despite fears of rising sea levels and violent storms, many people still dream of living on the water. It’s an idyllic life — until it isn’t.
Temperatures ranged from 3 to 7 degrees above normal across Georgia during October 2019. Despite the heat, above-average rainfall helped ease drought conditions across the state. CAES News
Temperatures ranged from 3 to 7 degrees above normal across Georgia during October 2019. Despite the heat, above-average rainfall helped ease drought conditions across the state.
October Climate
October saw the easing of drought conditions across the state, but many producers reported that the months of dry conditions had already harmed their crops.
Some parts of Georgia saw temperatures as high as 8 or 9 degrees above normal during September 2019. The heat and abnormally dry weather left much the state in some stage of drought. CAES News
Some parts of Georgia saw temperatures as high as 8 or 9 degrees above normal during September 2019. The heat and abnormally dry weather left much the state in some stage of drought.
Hot and Dry
While it seems Georgia is finally seeing a break from the summer heat, the long hot summer, including a record-setting September, has already caused problems for many Georgia farmers.
To stay informed during bad weather, every household needs a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, radio that broadcasts up-to-date details about tornadoes, thunderstorms, flash floods or tropical weather. And, make sure to stock up on fresh batteries in case there is a power outage. CAES News
To stay informed during bad weather, every household needs a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, radio that broadcasts up-to-date details about tornadoes, thunderstorms, flash floods or tropical weather. And, make sure to stock up on fresh batteries in case there is a power outage.
Hurricane Dorian
Hurricane Dorian may bring power outages, downed trees, heavy rain and possibly brief tornadoes to Georgia this weekend and well into next week. With the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Michael just over a month away, UGA's Pam Knox urges southwest Georgians to not let their guard down.
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) in honor of her career studying evolutionary biology and working to breed more resilient crop varieties. CAES News
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) in honor of her career studying evolutionary biology and working to breed more resilient crop varieties.
CSSA Fellow
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA).
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo. CAES News
Corn planted at the Bellflower Farm on the UGA Tifton campus in this March 30 photo.
Planting Conditions
Georgia farmers should expect dry weather when they plant their crops this spring, but Pam Knox, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences agricultural climatologist, anticipates an active tropical storm season in the Atlantic Ocean this summer.
Sandbags work to keep the sea at bay in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. University of Georgia scientist Craig Landry says there are places along the coast that are so at risk of eroding that they are pushed to embrace a "phased retreat."  Tourists could stop coming because of beach erosion and homeowners would sell because they can't afford insurance, or they are worried about losing their investment, he said. CAES News
Sandbags work to keep the sea at bay in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. University of Georgia scientist Craig Landry says there are places along the coast that are so at risk of eroding that they are pushed to embrace a "phased retreat."  Tourists could stop coming because of beach erosion and homeowners would sell because they can't afford insurance, or they are worried about losing their investment, he said.
Coastal Study
University of Georgia natural resource economist Craig Landry will use his portion of a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how the economy and the environment are affected when humans and coastal regions commingle. The four-year project is a team effort with researchers from Colorado, North Carolina and Ohio.
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply. CAES News
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply.
Upper Floridan Aquifer
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply.