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When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Emergency Food
News of the coronavirus has many people feeling uneasy and helpless. Building a supply of emergency food and water is a task University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say will help Georgians prepare for any kind of emergency, be it a medical quarantine, a snowstorm or a major power outage.
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options. CAES News
A new seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options.
Solar Workshop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a new seminar, “Solar Energy in Rural Georgia: Opportunities for Landowners,” on Thursday, March 26 at the UGA-Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia.
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Record Rainfall
Bright green grass across the fields, lawns and roadsides of northern and central Georgia is making those parts of the state look more like Ireland than a typical Georgia in February. Copious rain, coupled with periods of much warmer-than-normal temperatures, is waking up plants early and causing them to green up.
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes. CAES News
UGA climatologists have developed a new formula for calculating wet bulb temperature, which will help farmers protect their fruit crops from late freezes.
Sketchy Weather
Georgia weather is predictably unpredictable, bitter cold one week and balmy the next. For that reason, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts urge Georgia growers to pay close attention to the weather over the coming months and be prepared to use irrigation for frost protection and potential dry conditions as we move into spring.
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia. CAES News
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia.
Forage Management
According to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest forage agronomist, an unusually wet winter will cause problems with summer forage crop quality in Georgia.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer.
Onion Crop
Georgia’s Vidalia onion crop is planted and looks “promising,” according to Chris Tyson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s area onion agent, but he cautions producers to be proactive in managing onion diseases.
Peanuts being picked on the UGA Tifton campus on October 31, 2018. CAES News
Peanuts being picked on the UGA Tifton campus on October 31, 2018.
Peanut Crop
Three separate weather events this season will likely impact the quality and yield of a substantial amount of Georgia’s peanut acreage, according to Scott Monfort, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan agronomist.
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia. CAES News
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia.
Timber
The Georgia Forestry Commission estimates that 2.4 million acres of timber were damaged by Hurricane Michael. This equates to $763 million in direct losses.
A year after the devastation of Hurricane Michael, Georgia's pecan farmers are preparing for this year's crop. Pictured are pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
A year after the devastation of Hurricane Michael, Georgia's pecan farmers are preparing for this year's crop. Pictured are pecans on the ground following Hurricane Michael in Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Yields
Georgia’s pecan growers will have a limited supply this year due to weather conditions that affected the quality of the pecans and Hurricane Michael’s impact, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.