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Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood CAES News
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood
Spring Ant Control
Whether you have a well-manicured lawn or a wild preserve, almost every landscape in Georgia shares one feature: fire ants.
Patrick McCullough, UGA Extension weed specialist, was among the scientists who shared their findings at the UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day held on Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. McCullough is shown telling visitors the results of his study on bluegrass control in Bermuda grass. CAES News
Patrick McCullough, UGA Extension weed specialist, was among the scientists who shared their findings at the UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day held on Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. McCullough is shown telling visitors the results of his study on bluegrass control in Bermuda grass.
Turfgrass Updates
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day, held Aug. 9 on the UGA Griffin campus, provided research-based information about the production and management of turfgrass from UGA scientists and UGA Extension specialists.
A diseased leaf on a tree at the University of Georgia's Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Ga. CAES News
A diseased leaf on a tree at the University of Georgia's Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Ga.
Turf & Ornamentals
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day is set for Thursday, Aug. 9, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. This year, two optional, interactive sessions especially designed for landscape experts will follow the field day.
Shimat Joseph, an entomologist based on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, conducts research on turfgrass and ornamental plant pests. Joseph also works with UGA Cooperative Extension agents and teaches an entomology laboratory course for UGA students enrolled in the plant protection and pest management master's degree program. CAES News
Shimat Joseph, an entomologist based on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, conducts research on turfgrass and ornamental plant pests. Joseph also works with UGA Cooperative Extension agents and teaches an entomology laboratory course for UGA students enrolled in the plant protection and pest management master's degree program.
New Entomologist
Shimat Joseph, an entomologist based on the University of Georgia Griffin campus, will research turfgrass and ornamental plant pests as the newest member of the UGA Turfgrass Team.
A roll of freshly harvested sod CAES News
A roll of freshly harvested sod
Sod 101
Georgia turfgrass producers and industry leaders will gather Tuesday, Oct. 31, and Wednesday, Nov. 1, in Ft. Valley, Georgia, for the annual Georgia Sod and Turf Producers Field Day. Industry leaders and university experts will provide updates on turfgrass-related topics, and the latest equipment will be displayed and demonstrated at the event’s trade show.
Yellow leaves on a tree in the fall of the year CAES News
Yellow leaves on a tree in the fall of the year
Mower Mulching
Everyone loves to have good shade trees in their yard, but once summer is over, most people despise dealing with fallen leaves. There is an option that avoids having to rake leaves altogether: Let your mower do the work.
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core. CAES News
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core.
Room to Grow
Last year many lawns across the state didn’t receive enough rainfall for the grass to grow, photosynthesize and make carbohydrate reserves. Turfgrass that experienced this lack of rainfall will likely be slow to green up this spring. If rainfall totals return to normal this spring, lawns will recover, but they may do so at a slower rate because the production of reserves was compromised last fall. For example, a lawn that would typically be fully green and growing in mid-May might take until late May or June to green up. A two- to four-week delay in green-up of warm-season grasses may be common this spring.
David Jespersen is the newest member of the University of Georgia Turfgrass Team. CAES News
David Jespersen is the newest member of the University of Georgia Turfgrass Team.
New Turf Researcher
New Jersey native David Jespersen was selected to fill retired UGA turfgrass physiologist Bob Carrow’s position based in part on his research on the effects of heat stress on creeping bentgrass. Jespersen is adjusting to life in the South and to working on a small extended university campus.
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane. CAES News
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane.
Storm Damage
When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist Clint Waltz was among the UGA experts who presented their research findings at the Turfgrass Research Field Day on Thursday, Aug. 4. Waltz is shown explaining how commonly used products, like insect repellant, sunscreen, cooking oil and powdered Gatorade, can harm a turfgrass lawn. CAES News
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist Clint Waltz was among the UGA experts who presented their research findings at the Turfgrass Research Field Day on Thursday, Aug. 4. Waltz is shown explaining how commonly used products, like insect repellant, sunscreen, cooking oil and powdered Gatorade, can harm a turfgrass lawn.
Turfgrass Updates
More than 800 people braved the hot August temperatures for a firsthand glimpse of the latest research by University of Georgia scientists at the Turfgrass Research Field Day held Thursday, Aug. 4, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia.