Browse Entomology Stories

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Beekeeper and bees at the UGA Bee Laboratory on the university's Horticulture Research Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Beekeeper and bees at the UGA Bee Laboratory on the university's Horticulture Research Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Bee Institute
The national push to save pollinating insects has brought the plight of the honeybee and the art of beekeeping to the forefront. Those interested in becoming a beekeeper, as well as established beekeepers who need certification, can learn the latest research-based information at the annual Beekeeping Institute, May 22-25, at Young Harris College in Young Harris, Georgia.
Joe West, assistant dean of UGA-Tifton, is presented a Georgia Trust Award for the renovation work done on the Tift Building and Agricultural Research Building. Pictured on the far left is Georgia Schley Ritchie, chair of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation; Will Sumner of Allstate Construction; Tony Menefee of Menefee Architects; Gwynne Darden, UGA associate vice president for facilities planning; Scott Messer, UGA director of historic preservation; and Mark McDonald, president and CEO of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation. CAES News
Joe West, assistant dean of UGA-Tifton, is presented a Georgia Trust Award for the renovation work done on the Tift Building and Agricultural Research Building. Pictured on the far left is Georgia Schley Ritchie, chair of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation; Will Sumner of Allstate Construction; Tony Menefee of Menefee Architects; Gwynne Darden, UGA associate vice president for facilities planning; Scott Messer, UGA director of historic preservation; and Mark McDonald, president and CEO of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.
Georgia Trust Award
The restoration of two landmarks on the University of Georgia Tifton campus earned recognition from the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies. CAES News
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies.
Ant Queens
In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that’s not always the way ant societies function.
Brad K Hounkpati is shown in his UGA office with images of his lady bug collection shown on his computer screen. CAES News
Brad K Hounkpati is shown in his UGA office with images of his lady bug collection shown on his computer screen.
Lady Beetle Revisited
There are more than 6,000 species of lady beetles in the world, most having different natural histories and roles in their environments. Being able to identify the different species is vital to understanding them, and knowing what they look like is typically a major part of that process.
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium. CAES News
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Undergraduate Research
On April 3, almost 70 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) undergraduate students presented their research in the annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Pecan Pest
Ambrosia beetles are swarming south Georgia pecan orchards and farmers should take precautions now, according to Angel Acebes-Doria, pecan entomologist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood CAES News
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood
Spring Ant Control
Whether you have a well-manicured lawn or a wild preserve, almost every landscape in Georgia shares one feature: fire ants.
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
National Ag Week Salute
As we celebrate National Agriculture Week 2019, many in the Southeast are still struggling to recover from hurricanes, tornadoes, whitefly outbreaks and record-breaking rainfall. Nature is both the nemesis and nurturer of agriculture - the ultimate “can’t live with it, can’t live without it” dilemma.
Brian Kvitko and Gaelen Burke, two faculty members in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, were awarded Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grants from the National Science Foundation. CAES News
Brian Kvitko and Gaelen Burke, two faculty members in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, were awarded Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grants from the National Science Foundation.
CAREER Grants
Two University of Georgia researchers have been awarded Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Brian Kvitko and Gaelen Burke, both faculty members in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, were awarded the five-year grants this year.
Through the "Trees for Bees" project, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents are teaching children and adults how to create pollinator habitats. To promote a diverse pollinator habitat, plant pollinator-friendly plants, provide nesting boxes for cavity-nesting bees, leave spots of bare ground for ground-nesting bees and allow winter weeds to bloom to increase floral resources. CAES News
Through the "Trees for Bees" project, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents are teaching children and adults how to create pollinator habitats. To promote a diverse pollinator habitat, plant pollinator-friendly plants, provide nesting boxes for cavity-nesting bees, leave spots of bare ground for ground-nesting bees and allow winter weeds to bloom to increase floral resources.
Trees for Bees
Georgia’s Arbor Day celebration, Feb. 16, is a great time for Georgians to show some love for the state’s pollinators by planting trees that help support their habitat, said Becky Griffin, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension School and Community Garden coordinator.