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Jeffrey Dorfman currently serves as the state fiscal economist for the state of Georgia and a professor of agricultural economics at the University of Georgia. CAES News
Jeffrey Dorfman currently serves as the state fiscal economist for the state of Georgia and a professor of agricultural economics at the University of Georgia.
2020 Ag Forecast
Jeffrey Dorfman, the state fiscal economist for Georgia and a professor at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), will serve as the keynote speaker for four of the five locations during the 2020 Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series set for Jan. 21 through Jan. 31.
When the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech interact, especially around Thanksgiving, they’re typically colliding on the football field for another historic round of clean, old-fashioned hate. But what you see on the gridiron is 180 degrees from the relationship the two schools share in Georgia farm fields where they work in harmony — and often full-fledged partnership — to improve the productivity and profitability of various sectors of Georgia agriculture. CAES News
When the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech interact, especially around Thanksgiving, they’re typically colliding on the football field for another historic round of clean, old-fashioned hate. But what you see on the gridiron is 180 degrees from the relationship the two schools share in Georgia farm fields where they work in harmony — and often full-fledged partnership — to improve the productivity and profitability of various sectors of Georgia agriculture.
Rival Partners
When the University of Georgia and the Georgia Institute of Technology interact, especially around Thanksgiving, they’re typically colliding on the football field for another historic round of clean, old-fashioned hate. But what you see on the gridiron is 180 degrees from the relationship the two schools share in Georgia farm fields where they work in harmony — and often full-fledged partnership — to improve the productivity and profitability of various sectors of Georgia agriculture.
UGA CAES Dean Sam Pardue, center, congratulates CAES alumni Ken Foster, Charlie Broussard, Jaime Hinsdale Foster, Andrea B. Simao, Franklin West, Sarah Dunn and Tamlin Hall during the 65th CAES Alumni Association Awards Banquet on Oct. 4 in Athens, Georgia. CAES News
UGA CAES Dean Sam Pardue, center, congratulates CAES alumni Ken Foster, Charlie Broussard, Jaime Hinsdale Foster, Andrea B. Simao, Franklin West, Sarah Dunn and Tamlin Hall during the 65th CAES Alumni Association Awards Banquet on Oct. 4 in Athens, Georgia.
Alumni Awards
The CAES Alumni Association presented the 2019 awards at the 65th  University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Alumni Association Awards banquet on Oct. 4 at the Classic Center in downtown Athens, Georgia.
Teachers break down a broiler to help learn about the anatomy of a chicken at the UGA Department of Poultry Science’s Avian Academy teacher training. CAES News
Teachers break down a broiler to help learn about the anatomy of a chicken at the UGA Department of Poultry Science’s Avian Academy teacher training.
Avian Academy
Chickens are a vital part of Georgia’s economy and the state’s agricultural heritage. And thanks to a University of Georgia program for teachers, chickens will be helping middle school and high school teachers educate students in Georgia classrooms.
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium. CAES News
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Undergraduate Research
On April 3, almost 70 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) undergraduate students presented their research in the annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
Poultry Ventilation
While diners may enjoy hot chicken wings and Nashville’s famous hot fried chicken, no one likes hot chickens — especially not poultry farmers.
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair. CAES News
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair.
LEAD21 Graduates
Three University of Georgia professors were among the 79 individuals who completed the 14th class of the LEAD21 leadership-development program. Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, all faculty in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, represented UGA in the program, which is designed for land-grant institutions and their strategic partners from across the nation.
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
National Ag Week Salute
As we celebrate National Agriculture Week 2019, many in the Southeast are still struggling to recover from hurricanes, tornadoes, whitefly outbreaks and record-breaking rainfall. Nature is both the nemesis and nurturer of agriculture - the ultimate “can’t live with it, can’t live without it” dilemma.
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers. CAES News
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers.
Poultry Health
Like human infants, baby chicks are born without immunity to many common diseases. Immunizations are the answer, but it can be hard to immunize entire flocks of chickens in an efficient manner. That’s where poultry health specialists like Brian Jordan come in.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
Metabolism Genetics
As far as poultry farmers are concerned, feed equals money. The more efficient chickens are at turning feed into thighs, breast and drumsticks, the healthier their bottom line. It turns out that the same science that can help poultry farmers raise more feed-efficient chickens could help people become healthier, too.