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When cows are exposed to a temperature-humidity index above 68, their milk production begins to decrease. UGA animal and dairy scientists are searching for ways to ease heat stress and improve dairy productivity. CAES News
When cows are exposed to a temperature-humidity index above 68, their milk production begins to decrease. UGA animal and dairy scientists are searching for ways to ease heat stress and improve dairy productivity.
Heat Stress Research
Georgia’s summer heat can make it hard to do almost anything outside and, for dairy cows, that includes producing milk. Heat stress is inevitable in the Southeast U.S., and the first week of August had temperatures soaring past 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
Daniela Lourenco, who first came to UGA to finish her doctoral research, serves as an assistant professor in the Department of Animal and Dairy Science. Her research focuses on using big data analytics to improve livestock breeding. CAES News
Daniela Lourenco, who first came to UGA to finish her doctoral research, serves as an assistant professor in the Department of Animal and Dairy Science. Her research focuses on using big data analytics to improve livestock breeding.
Livestock Genetics
As an undergraduate student in Brazil, Daniela Lourenco knew that she loved statistics and genetics, but she wasn’t sure where that passion would take her.
Forty-six people presented posters at the RBC Symposium held Friday, April 26. RBC Symposium Judge Simon Platt, BVM&S, a UGA professor of veterinary neurology, is shown with RBC poster presenter Katherine Watkins of the Easley Lab. View more images at https://adobe.ly/2vBPsxf. CAES News
Forty-six people presented posters at the RBC Symposium held Friday, April 26. RBC Symposium Judge Simon Platt, BVM&S, a UGA professor of veterinary neurology, is shown with RBC poster presenter Katherine Watkins of the Easley Lab. View more images at https://adobe.ly/2vBPsxf.
Student Researchers
The 5th annual Regenerative Bioscience Center Fellows Symposium drew more than 54 student participants. The gathering generally focused around the center’s core research projects of stroke, neurological injury, and orthopedic conditions. The 2019 event, titled Climb Higher, included students in the CAES Animal and Dairy Science program.
Todd Callaway CAES News
Todd Callaway
Microbiome Detective
The digestive tract of a cow is home to a diverse population of bacteria and microbes representing about 2,000 different species. There are good guys. There are bad guys. And there are the guys who can cause trouble if the situation is right.
Dairy cows grazing in Oglethorpe County. CAES News
Dairy cows grazing in Oglethorpe County.
Farm Manager
Managing one farm is a big job; managing a network of four teaching and research farms for the University of Georgia takes a different breed of farmer.
Francis Fluharty is the head of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Animal and Dairy Science. CAES News
Francis Fluharty is the head of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Animal and Dairy Science.
Animal and Dairy Science Leader
Francis Fluharty joins the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as the new department head of the Department of Animal and Dairy Science. His career has been devoted to assisting food animal producers through research and educational programs aimed at improving animal health and growth. Fluharty has also worked to improve profitability, as food animal agriculture must be economically-sustainable for farm families.
Steers graze on sorghum-sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Steers graze on sorghum-sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages.
Grazing School 2017
A two-day Advanced Grazing School, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists Sept. 19-20, will provide a deeper understanding of grazing systems to those in attendance. 
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau. CAES News
The 2017 Georgia Ag Forecast event in Macon was held at the Georgia Farm Bureau Building. CAES ag economist Don Shurley is shown (r) with Hunter Loggins of the Georgia Agribusiness Council and Tas Smith of the Georgia Farm Bureau.
2017 Ag Forecast
In 2017, Georgia row crop farmers will likely devote more acreage to the state’s tried-and-true commodities: cotton and peanuts. This and other agricultural projections for the year were the focus of the 10th annual Georgia Ag Forecast seminar series, held across the state Jan. 18-27.
Carleen Porter at University Perugia in Italy CAES News
Carleen Porter at University Perugia in Italy
Carleen Porter
Carleen Porter, a fourth year Animal Science major spent eight weeks at the University of Perugia Veterinary School in Perugia, Italy, fulfilling the internship requirement for the International Agriculture Certificate. How did you decide on this program? Last spring, I was going to be part of a UGA-sponsored program in Verona for three months. I contacted Amanda Stephens (CAES Associate Director of Student Engagement) about adding on the certificate internship. Amanda was able to work with the UGA veterinary school to secure a veterinary internship at the University of Perugia.
Using a farm pond as a giant watering dish for cattle may be an easy way to provide livestock with water, but it's not the healthiest. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say this can spread diseases through a herd, affect the fish quality and destroy the stability of the pond's shoreline. CAES News
Using a farm pond as a giant watering dish for cattle may be an easy way to provide livestock with water, but it's not the healthiest. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say this can spread diseases through a herd, affect the fish quality and destroy the stability of the pond's shoreline.
Pond Water
Many Georgia farmers use their fish ponds as water sources for livestock. A pond located in a pasture is a convenient and dependable source of water for stock, but letting cattle have free access to a pond is not the best decision for the animals, the pond or the fish that live there.