Browse Plant Pests and Diseases Stories

192 results found for Plant Pests and Diseases
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash. CAES News
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash.
Whitefly Management
Researchers from three research institutions are using a $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fight whiteflies on vegetable crops.
Bermuda grass stem maggot damages the upper leaves of a forage crop. Lisa Baxter estimates about 60% yield loss in this picture. CAES News
Bermuda grass stem maggot damages the upper leaves of a forage crop. Lisa Baxter estimates about 60% yield loss in this picture.
Forage Pest Management
Drought-like conditions this summer are forcing Georgia forage farmers to delay treatments for Bermuda grass stem maggot, according to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension forage specialist.
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County. CAES News
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County.
Pecan Dieback
Nearly a year after thousands of trees were destroyed by Hurricane Michael, Georgia pecan producers are reporting the dieback of pecan branches and leaf burning in trees that survived the October 2018 storm, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.
Pictured is an image of cotton suspected of suffering from symptoms of Cotton Blue Disease. CAES News
Pictured is an image of cotton suspected of suffering from symptoms of Cotton Blue Disease.
Cotton Virus
Scientists from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Scientists are investigating the epidemiology of cotton leaf roll dwarf virus (CLRDV) in Georgia using a $75,000 grant jointly funded by the Georgia Cotton Commission and Cotton Incorporated.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
This is an image of Vidalia onions at a farm stand in Tattnall County, Georgia. CAES News
This is an image of Vidalia onions at a farm stand in Tattnall County, Georgia.
Onion Storage
With Georgia’s Vidalia onion harvest approaching, growers must prepare to protect their crops from diseases during storage, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Pecan Pest
Ambrosia beetles are swarming south Georgia pecan orchards and farmers should take precautions now, according to Angel Acebes-Doria, pecan entomologist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects. CAES News
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects.
Nature's Helpers
While the use of beneficial insects and other biocontrols for agricultural pest management hasn’t gained widespread usage in open field production, some Georgia farmers are using natural control methods in greenhouse and high-tunnel production.
A Joro spider found in Hoschton, Georgia in 2018. CAES News
A Joro spider found in Hoschton, Georgia in 2018.
Joro Spiders
If northeast Georgia yards seem a little extra spooky this Halloween season, there’s a good reason. They may have a little extra help from a new neighbor who is really into those cobweb decorations. 
This photo shows what a crop looks like when it's protected with row covers for four weeks (left) versus being left without row covers (right). CAES News
This photo shows what a crop looks like when it's protected with row covers for four weeks (left) versus being left without row covers (right).
Row Covers
Row covers, material used to protect plants from the cold and wind, can also protect squash from disease-carrying squash bugs and other insect pests, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Plant Pathologist Elizabeth Little.