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University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing. CAES News
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing.
Healthy Homes
As messages about COVID-19 come in from all angles, consumers need clear, direct information on how to keep themselves and their families safe from potential infection. University of Georgia food scientists offer tips on staying healthy and protecting your family.
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. CAES News
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Takeout Safer
Buying takeout food is a good choice to lower risks of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers. CAES News
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers.
Food Waste
Most Americans buy food knowing that they will likely throw some of it away. And, as incomes rise, so does the amount of food that’s wasted. These are just a few of the findings revealed by a food waste study conducted by University of Georgia economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
A concession stand at the Kiwanis Club Fairgrounds in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
A concession stand at the Kiwanis Club Fairgrounds in Griffin, Ga.
Safe Concession Food
Concession stands are great fundraisers. But the safety and well-being of the diners, as well as the organization’s reputation, lies in the hands of the servers.
An array of food products CAES News
An array of food products
Store Food
As tropical storms and hurricanes pound the U.S. East Coast, homeowners listen closely to local weather broadcasts. Whether or not a record-breaking storm affects you, University of Georgia experts say that having an emergency food supply on hand is always a good idea.
Canning beans in a pressure canner. May 2008. CAES News
Canning beans in a pressure canner. May 2008.
Home Canning
If you are thinking about following in your grandmother’s footsteps to preserve food this summer, start preparing now by gathering your equipment and supplies. The proper tools should be kept in good condition to ensure safe, high quality, home-canned food.
Food safety researcher Larry Beuchat, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Georgia, looks at a petri dish containing salmonella. CAES News
Food safety researcher Larry Beuchat, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Georgia, looks at a petri dish containing salmonella.
Dangerous Snacks
Researchers at the University of Georgia found that pathogens, like salmonella, can survive for at least six months in cookies and crackers. The recent study was prompted by an increased number of outbreaks of foodborne diseases linked to low-water-activity, or dry, foods.
University of Georgia food scientists had participants in a recent workshop taste three brands of worcestershire sauce to demonstrate how one food item can taste different from different manufacturers. Participants in the class were considering or have developed a new food product for the retail market. CAES News
University of Georgia food scientists had participants in a recent workshop taste three brands of worcestershire sauce to demonstrate how one food item can taste different from different manufacturers. Participants in the class were considering or have developed a new food product for the retail market.
Food Workshop
Potential new food product developers from across the state learned the process of creating, packaging and launching a new food product at the University of Georgia’s New Food Business Workshop, held Oct. 6-7 on the university’s Griffin Campus.
Pie pumpkin painted during workshop at UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Pie pumpkin painted during workshop at UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Ga.
Preserving Pumpkins
Pumpkins are a staple of fall-time cuisine and festivities. Whether canned, dried or pickled, there are some important tips to keep in mind when preserving this holiday favorite. Due to natural acidity levels, pumpkins require certain precautions be taken when canning in order to make preserves that are safe to eat.
University of Georgia food science students have been awarded first place by the DuPont Company for their creation of a new breakfast muffin. The muffin does not contain bread. Instead, it's made of quinoa, ham and eggs and is similar to quiche. CAES News
University of Georgia food science students have been awarded first place by the DuPont Company for their creation of a new breakfast muffin. The muffin does not contain bread. Instead, it's made of quinoa, ham and eggs and is similar to quiche.
Quiche-like Sandwich
University of Georgia food science students have created a bread-free, microwavable breakfast sandwich that, if marketed, would fill a need for consumers on low-carbohydrate or gluten-free diets. Either way, the new food idea won them a national award and $10,000 to share.