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Forty-six people presented posters at the RBC Symposium held Friday, April 26. RBC Symposium Judge Simon Platt, BVM&S, a UGA professor of veterinary neurology, is shown with RBC poster presenter Katherine Watkins of the Easley Lab. View more images at https://adobe.ly/2vBPsxf. CAES News
Forty-six people presented posters at the RBC Symposium held Friday, April 26. RBC Symposium Judge Simon Platt, BVM&S, a UGA professor of veterinary neurology, is shown with RBC poster presenter Katherine Watkins of the Easley Lab. View more images at https://adobe.ly/2vBPsxf.
Student Researchers
The 5th annual Regenerative Bioscience Center Fellows Symposium drew more than 54 student participants. The gathering generally focused around the center’s core research projects of stroke, neurological injury, and orthopedic conditions. The 2019 event, titled Climb Higher, included students in the CAES Animal and Dairy Science program.
University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical scientists have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models. Led by UGA Professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University, the team created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. The tiny tubular shape of an exosome allows EV therapy to cross barriers cells cannot. The exosomes, shown in the photo as small, red punctate clusters, are taken up by neurons, shown as green cell extensions surrounding a blue nucleus. CAES News
University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical scientists have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models. Led by UGA Professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University, the team created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. The tiny tubular shape of an exosome allows EV therapy to cross barriers cells cannot. The exosomes, shown in the photo as small, red punctate clusters, are taken up by neurons, shown as green cell extensions surrounding a blue nucleus.
Stroke Treatment
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical, a UGA startup company, have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain’s natural healing tendencies in animal models.
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells. CAES News
Associate Professor Franklin West (left) and Emily Baker working with induced pluripotent stem cells generated from a patient's own somatic cells.
New Stroke Model
It is well-known in the medical field that the pig brain shares certain physiological and anatomical similarities with the human brain. So similar are the two that researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed the first U.S. pig model for stroke treatments...
The picture represents the sustained presence of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) within the 'Brain Glue' construct four weeks after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), according to University of Georgia scientist Lohitash Karumbaiah who led the team that designed and created Brain Glue. The construct laden with labeled NSCs was delivered directly into the lesion 48 hours post-TBI. CAES News
The picture represents the sustained presence of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) within the 'Brain Glue' construct four weeks after a severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), according to University of Georgia scientist Lohitash Karumbaiah who led the team that designed and created Brain Glue. The construct laden with labeled NSCs was delivered directly into the lesion 48 hours post-TBI.
'Brain Glue'
Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed Brain Glue, a substance that could one day serve as a treatment for traumatic brain injuries, or TBIs. 
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection. CAES News
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection.
Zika Virus Research
A University of Georgia graduate student is using early stage chicken embryos to monitor the progression of the Zika virus. By collecting data on how the virus affects brain development, researchers at UGA can pinpoint the best treatments to stop or slow the progression of early-stage microcephaly, a rare birth defect linked to the Zika virus.
A group of students enjoys canoeing on the lake at Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Ga. CAES News
A group of students enjoys canoeing on the lake at Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Ga.
National 4-H Week
Georgia 4-H’s 172,354 student members will celebrate National 4-H Week Oct. 2-8. During the week, the state’s largest youth development organization wants to raise awareness of the program that started as a club for farm kids and has grown into a place that helps youth become successful and confident adults.
5-year-old Parks Powell plays an educational game on his parents' iPad. CAES News
5-year-old Parks Powell plays an educational game on his parents' iPad.
Kids and Tablets
Tablets have become commonplace in today’s classrooms, even as early as preschool or kindergarten. If used appropriately, these touchscreen devices can enhance instruction, according to a UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.
UGA researchers Franklin West and Steve Stice have developed pig induced pluripotent stem cell from pig skin cells. These cells can be used to replace damaged neural rosette cells. CAES News
UGA researchers Franklin West and Steve Stice have developed pig induced pluripotent stem cell from pig skin cells. These cells can be used to replace damaged neural rosette cells.
Brain Cure
A pig’s skin cells may hold the key to new treatments and cures for devastating human neurological diseases. Researchers from the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences working in the UGA Regenerative Bioscience Center have discovered a process of turning pig induced pluripotent stem cells into induced neural stem cells.