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As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). CAES News
As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
Coronavirus Research
When COVID-19 was identified, Malak Esseili stopped taking her children along on trips to the grocery store and she told her sisters to start wearing scarves as makeshift masks while in public. As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Esseili studied the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
Dr. John Peroni at an RBC research roundtable meeting. At the table, left to right, Hitesh Handa, Peroni, Lohitash Karumbaiah and Jason Locklin. (Submitted photo taken in 2018) CAES News
Dr. John Peroni at an RBC research roundtable meeting. At the table, left to right, Hitesh Handa, Peroni, Lohitash Karumbaiah and Jason Locklin. (Submitted photo taken in 2018)
Lymph System
A team including University of Georgia researchers has for the first time documented the regrowth of surgically removed pathways in the lymphatic system, a network of vessels designed to pump away inflammatory fluids and defend the body against infection.
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm. CAES News
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm.
COVID-10 Ag Safety
Farmers and food processors take routine steps to reduce the likelihood of foodborne pathogens, like Salmonella and E. coli, contacting our food and causing illness. The procedures that our food industry takes on a daily basis are also effective in reducing the chances that the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 will come in contact with the food we eat.
Left, imaging of healthy neurons from mouse brain. Right, imaging of damaged neurons by PD protein clumps. CAES News
Left, imaging of healthy neurons from mouse brain. Right, imaging of damaged neurons by PD protein clumps.
‘Natural killer’ cells could halt Parkinson’s progression
Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and their colleagues have found that “natural killer” white blood cells could guard against the cascade of cellular changes that lead to Parkinson’s disease and help stop its progression.
Samantha Spellicy, a graduate student of the Stice lab at the University of Georgia, performs a lab test on the therapeutic activity of exosomes. CAES News
Samantha Spellicy, a graduate student of the Stice lab at the University of Georgia, performs a lab test on the therapeutic activity of exosomes.
Stroke Recovery
University of Georgia animal scientists, funded by the National Institutes of Health, have brain-imaging data for a new stroke treatment that supports full recovery in swine, modeled with the same pattern of neurodegeneration as seen in humans with severe stroke.
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology. With this potential new technique, RBC researchers, including Steve Stice (left) and Lohitash Karumbaiah (right), hope to boost the brain’s natural ability to recover and provide physicians with a treatment that can be administered immediately in cases of severe TBI. CAES News
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology. With this potential new technique, RBC researchers, including Steve Stice (left) and Lohitash Karumbaiah (right), hope to boost the brain’s natural ability to recover and provide physicians with a treatment that can be administered immediately in cases of severe TBI.
“Cargo” Molecules
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes — “cargo” molecules within the nervous system that carry messages to the brain — can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology.
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers. CAES News
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers.
Poultry Health
Like human infants, baby chicks are born without immunity to many common diseases. Immunizations are the answer, but it can be hard to immunize entire flocks of chickens in an efficient manner. That’s where poultry health specialists like Brian Jordan come in.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
Metabolism Genetics
As far as poultry farmers are concerned, feed equals money. The more efficient chickens are at turning feed into thighs, breast and drumsticks, the healthier their bottom line. It turns out that the same science that can help poultry farmers raise more feed-efficient chickens could help people become healthier, too.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, will be held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018, at the Crowne Plaza Atlanta-Airport.
Combatting Rural Stress
The challenges facing rural America today are diverse, and the answers to rural issues won’t come from a single expert or institution.
The research team, led by University of Georgia's Steven Stice and Augusta University's Nasrul Hoda, created a treatment called "AB126" using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells.  CAES News
The research team, led by University of Georgia's Steven Stice and Augusta University's Nasrul Hoda, created a treatment called "AB126" using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells. 
Georgia Bio Awards
Two of five Georgia Bio Awards presented last month to University of Georgia faculty were programs either in or affiliated with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES).