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UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge. CAES News
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge.
UGArden Donations
Food insecurity is an issue among college students that is rarely discussed but all too common. With limited funds or inconsistent income streams, some college students may have to choose between paying rent and buying groceries.
CAES Office of Global Programs Associate Director Vicki McMaken, CAES doctoral candidate Davis Musia Gimode and CAES undergraduate Sara Reeves attended this year’s World Food Prize symposium in Des Moines, Iowa. CAES News
CAES Office of Global Programs Associate Director Vicki McMaken, CAES doctoral candidate Davis Musia Gimode and CAES undergraduate Sara Reeves attended this year’s World Food Prize symposium in Des Moines, Iowa.
World Food Prize
Students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) spend a lot of class time discussing ways to end food insecurity, but there are many lessons that can’t be learned in the classroom.
Upland cotton typically produces cotton with short or medium fibers.  Regents' Professor Andrew Paterson, and fellow CAES crop and soil sciences professor Peng Chee, are working to develop upland cotton varieties with longer fibers. CAES News
Upland cotton typically produces cotton with short or medium fibers.  Regents' Professor Andrew Paterson, and fellow CAES crop and soil sciences professor Peng Chee, are working to develop upland cotton varieties with longer fibers.
Cottonseed Oil
Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that a high-fat diet enriched with cottonseed oil drastically improved cholesterol profiles in young adult men. Participants showed significant reductions in cholesterol and triglycerides.
The only way to know that beef is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all whole-muscle cuts of beef to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit and all ground beef products and enhanced or blade-tenderized products to a minimum of 160 F. CAES News
The only way to know that beef is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all whole-muscle cuts of beef to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit and all ground beef products and enhanced or blade-tenderized products to a minimum of 160 F.
Grilling Safety
It’s football season, and tailgating before a game is a traditional part of the experience. Unfortunately, grilling your favorite cut of beef means increasing the potential for foodborne illness due to improper handling of food. These reminders from the University of Georgia Meat Science and Technology Center will provide you with grilling skills to keep foodborne illness far from your fall tailgating get-togethers.
The Food and Drug Administration proposed several changes to the 20 year old Nutrition Facts label on Feb. 27. UGA nutrition experts and researchers believe that the proposed changes, which have not been finalized, will help Georgians make more informed food choices. CAES News
The Food and Drug Administration proposed several changes to the 20 year old Nutrition Facts label on Feb. 27. UGA nutrition experts and researchers believe that the proposed changes, which have not been finalized, will help Georgians make more informed food choices.
Hidden Calories
Have you ever accepted that second slice of pie because it was “low carb” or “fat free”?
High-calorie drinks lined up in refrigerator. June 2009. CAES News
High-calorie drinks lined up in refrigerator. June 2009.
Healthy Lunch
Are you worried about packing a healthy lunch for your kids this school year? If so, you are not alone; lots of parents struggle to provide nutritious foods that their kids will actually enjoy eating every day for lunch.
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County. CAES News
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County.
Metro Mobile Markets
Summer isn’t quite the same without fresh corn, beans, okra and tomatoes, but many Georgians don’t have easy access to the state’s bounty of produce.
CAES News
Agricultural Education
On a typical Friday morning in the middle of the semester, Abigail Borron's students aren't in class. They're out working in food pantries across north Georgia, helping to give a face to food insecurity.
Homemade fruit roll-ups can easily be made a home with the help of a food dehydrator or oven. CAES News
Homemade fruit roll-ups can easily be made a home with the help of a food dehydrator or oven.
Homemade Fruit Roll-Ups
If winter weather is keeping your family indoors, use the time to make and enjoy homemade fruit roll-ups. Using a food dehydrator and directions from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, you can make some simple fruit roll-up snacks that are lower in sugar than those that are commercially produced.
Supermarket beef case at Buford Farmers Market CAES News
Supermarket beef case at Buford Farmers Market
Federal dietary guidelines
While early reaction to the new dietary guidelines released by the federal government on Thursday focused on new warnings about added sugar, sodium and meat, a University of Georgia expert noted the report is largely consistent with previous versions.