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This Thanksgiving, Georgians can bring a little local flavor to their tables with products that have been featured in UGA's Flavor of Georgia food product contest. CAES News
This Thanksgiving, Georgians can bring a little local flavor to their tables with products that have been featured in UGA's Flavor of Georgia food product contest.
Georgia Thanksgiving
While you are planning your Thanksgiving menu, save a spot next to the turkey for these former finalists in the University of Georgia’s Flavor of Georgia food product contest.
Professor and Head of the Department of Foods and Nutrition in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences Lynn Bailey speaks about the importance of nutritional interventions for maternal and childhood health at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Global Food Security Summit. CAES News
Professor and Head of the Department of Foods and Nutrition in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences Lynn Bailey speaks about the importance of nutritional interventions for maternal and childhood health at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Global Food Security Summit.
Food Security Summit
When it comes to the goal of feeding the world’s growing population, the only certainty is that it will take a multipronged approach.
Chef Lidia Bastianich will speak at the UGA Chapel on Oct. 2 at 3 p.m. The event, "A Conversation with Lidia Bastianich: A Life of Love, Family, and Food,” is sponsored by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES). It is free and open to the public. CAES News
Chef Lidia Bastianich will speak at the UGA Chapel on Oct. 2 at 3 p.m. The event, "A Conversation with Lidia Bastianich: A Life of Love, Family, and Food,” is sponsored by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES). It is free and open to the public.
Chefs and Agriculture
Before farm-to-table was a culinary catchphrase, there were families who ate what they grew on their farms simply because that’s what they had to eat.
In addition to produce safety procedures, UGA Extension helps farmers develop record-keeping plans to help keep them in line with FDA food safety guidelines. Cory McCue of Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia, makes notes about the farm's July harvest in the packinghouse while Christine White packs shishito peppers into 10-pound bags. CAES News
In addition to produce safety procedures, UGA Extension helps farmers develop record-keeping plans to help keep them in line with FDA food safety guidelines. Cory McCue of Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia, makes notes about the farm's July harvest in the packinghouse while Christine White packs shishito peppers into 10-pound bags.
Produce Safety
Over the past decade, Americans have fallen in love with locally grown produce, but just because something is grown nearby doesn’t automatically make it safe.
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus.
Source ID
A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks.
Fall is apple time in north Georgia. It's the one time of year Georgians find locally grown versions of this fruit. CAES News
Fall is apple time in north Georgia. It's the one time of year Georgians find locally grown versions of this fruit.
Apples
For Georgians, fall-season family time often includes trips to the mountains to see the changing leaves and buy Georgia-grown apples. If you are ever overwhelmed by the variety of apples available for sale, here are some tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to help you make wise choices this apple season and select varieties that can be preserved successfully.
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process.
Cottonseed Oil
Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that a high-fat diet enriched with cottonseed oil drastically improved cholesterol profiles in young adult men. Participants showed significant reductions in cholesterol and triglycerides.
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Casimir Akoh CAES News
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Casimir Akoh
Public Health Award
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Casimir Akoh recently accepted the Institute of Food Technologists’ (IFT) research award. The award recognizes an improvement in public health.
When planning a game day party, make healthy food choices by using white meat, such as the chicken in this chicken log, instead of beef and pork. To ensure that food remains at safe temperatures, keep cold-perishable foods in the refrigerator until right before the party and don't leave them at room temperature for more than two hours. CAES News
When planning a game day party, make healthy food choices by using white meat, such as the chicken in this chicken log, instead of beef and pork. To ensure that food remains at safe temperatures, keep cold-perishable foods in the refrigerator until right before the party and don't leave them at room temperature for more than two hours.
Game Day Food
Football season is here. Whether you are tailgating at the game or hosting a game day party at home, following a few easy tips from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension can ensure you have a fun, healthy game day.
The only way to know that beef is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all whole-muscle cuts of beef to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit and all ground beef products and enhanced or blade-tenderized products to a minimum of 160 F. CAES News
The only way to know that beef is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all whole-muscle cuts of beef to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit and all ground beef products and enhanced or blade-tenderized products to a minimum of 160 F.
Grilling Safety
It’s football season, and tailgating before a game is a traditional part of the experience. Unfortunately, grilling your favorite cut of beef means increasing the potential for foodborne illness due to improper handling of food. These reminders from the University of Georgia Meat Science and Technology Center will provide you with grilling skills to keep foodborne illness far from your fall tailgating get-togethers.