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As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). CAES News
As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
Coronavirus Research
When COVID-19 was identified, Malak Esseili stopped taking her children along on trips to the grocery store and she told her sisters to start wearing scarves as makeshift masks while in public. As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Esseili studied the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm. CAES News
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm.
COVID-10 Ag Safety
Farmers and food processors take routine steps to reduce the likelihood of foodborne pathogens, like Salmonella and E. coli, contacting our food and causing illness. The procedures that our food industry takes on a daily basis are also effective in reducing the chances that the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 will come in contact with the food we eat.
This is the first time that U.S. Census responses are widely being submitted online, although paper and telephone self-responses are also being accepted through Oct. 31. CAES News
This is the first time that U.S. Census responses are widely being submitted online, although paper and telephone self-responses are also being accepted through Oct. 31.
2020 Census
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected much of daily life for Americans, but a few minutes spent completing the 2020 U.S. Census now will make a big impact in the coming decade.
Squash plants grow in the UGA Research and Education Garden. CAES News
Squash plants grow in the UGA Research and Education Garden.
Vegetable Gardening
While adults and children spend more time at home as a result of the COVID-19 crisis, planting a garden or container garden is a great activity to plan together. It’s outside, active, educational and edible. With some grocery stores taking longer than usual to stock some items, vegetable gardening is a great way to keep your refrigerator stocked.
Georgia 4-H offers digital environmental education series CAES News
Georgia 4-H offers digital environmental education series
Virtual EE
Each spring, thousands of K-12 students attend environmental education camps at Georgia 4-H facilities across the state. They hold snakes, hike through creeks and marshes, visit historic sites and enjoy nature; all with a goal of learning about the environment. Since the COVID-19 outbreak has public schools closed, school buses parked and Georgians sheltered in place, the Georgia 4-H Environmental Education Program is now being offered virtually.
Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses. CAES News
Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses.
COVID-19 Farm Safety
While there is no evidence that the COVID-19 virus is a food safety concern, it is a worker health concern as it spreads via close person-to-person contact or by contact with contaminated surfaces.
Georgia growers, who rely on seasonal workers, need to plan ahead to be prepared for the harvest. CAES News
Georgia growers, who rely on seasonal workers, need to plan ahead to be prepared for the harvest.
Pandemic could affect vegetable harvest
Most vegetable crops in Georgia — such as bell pepper, specialty peppers, tomato, eggplant, cucumber, yellow squash, and zucchini — are currently being planted into early April. These crops should be harvested in May and June; however, in light of the current coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, Georgia growers, who rely on seasonal workers, need to plan ahead to be prepared for the harvest.
Logo for Virtual DPA CAES News
Logo for Virtual DPA
4-H'ers will be able to participate in virtual area contests
More than 1,500 fourth, fifth and sixth graders will now have the opportunity to participate in Georgia 4-H’s first Virtual Cloverleaf Project Achievement contest. Last year, more than 3,700 youth participated in Cloverleaf Project Achievement contests. Due to recent developments, five competitions around the state will now take place in an online format. While 13 in-person competitions were originally scheduled, area contestants in Bacon, Douglas, Emanuel, Houston and Jackson counties will now have the opportunity to participate virtually.
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing. CAES News
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing.
Healthy Homes
As messages about COVID-19 come in from all angles, consumers need clear, direct information on how to keep themselves and their families safe from potential infection. University of Georgia food scientists offer tips on staying healthy and protecting your family.
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. CAES News
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Takeout Safer
Buying takeout food is a good choice to lower risks of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.