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To stay informed during bad weather, every household needs a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, radio that broadcasts up-to-date details about tornadoes, thunderstorms, flash floods or tropical weather. And, make sure to stock up on fresh batteries in case there is a power outage. CAES News
To stay informed during bad weather, every household needs a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, radio that broadcasts up-to-date details about tornadoes, thunderstorms, flash floods or tropical weather. And, make sure to stock up on fresh batteries in case there is a power outage.
Hurricane Dorian
Hurricane Dorian may bring power outages, downed trees, heavy rain and possibly brief tornadoes to Georgia this weekend and well into next week. With the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Michael just over a month away, UGA's Pam Knox urges southwest Georgians to not let their guard down.
High winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground. CAES News
High winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground.
Georgia Cotton Crop
What was an extremely promising Georgia cotton crop was devastated when Hurricane Michael ravaged south Georgia Oct. 10-11. According to Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist, the prospects of 1,500 to 1,800 pounds of dryland cotton for some producers were reduced, resulting in 80 to 90 percent losses in some fields.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents Nan Bostick (left) and Lindsey Hayes (right) tour one of Rob Cohen's (center) pecan orchards in Decatur County, Georgia, following Hurricane Michael. CAES News
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents Nan Bostick (left) and Lindsey Hayes (right) tour one of Rob Cohen's (center) pecan orchards in Decatur County, Georgia, following Hurricane Michael.
Hurricane Michael Totals
Hurricane Michael blew across southwest Georgia on Oct. 10, causing more than $2 billion in losses to the state’s agriculture industry, according to early estimates from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural economists and Extension agents.
Some farms experienced close to 90 percent loss of their vegetable crops last week when Hurricane Michael tore through southwestern Georgia. 
In this Grady County field, the wind lodged plants and defoliated them, exposing the peppers to sun damage. CAES News
Some farms experienced close to 90 percent loss of their vegetable crops last week when Hurricane Michael tore through southwestern Georgia. 
In this Grady County field, the wind lodged plants and defoliated them, exposing the peppers to sun damage.
Vegetable Damage
With the state’s late summer and fall vegetable crop close to harvest, Georgia vegetable farmers estimate more than $480 million in losses from Hurricane Michael.
Winds from Tropical Storm Irma uprooted a tree on the lawn of the United Bank in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Winds from Tropical Storm Irma uprooted a tree on the lawn of the United Bank in Griffin, Georgia.
Hurricane Michael
Hurricanes, tropical storms and severe rainfall events are commonly seen among states in the Southeast U.S. These natural events most often occur during summer or early fall and may cause severe problems for urban and agricultural areas of Georgia. As of this week, it appears that we have another hurricane poised to strike Georgia. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wants all of its agents — and the fruit, vegetable and nut growers they serve — to be as prepared as possible for the effects of the storm.
Chainsaw trainings are being held across Georgia. CAES News
Chainsaw trainings are being held across Georgia.
Safety Training
Using grant funds from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the University of Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture has developed safety training for green industry employees. To date, these programs have reached more than 4,000 workers.
As a result of a roof leak, mold grows on the ceiling of a home. CAES News
As a result of a roof leak, mold grows on the ceiling of a home.
Fight Mold
Hurricane Irma had slowed down by the time she reached Georgia, reducing the amount of expected structural damage to homes, but flood waters may have left behind a sneaky and dangerous after-effect: mold.
Winds from Tropical Storm Irma uprooted a tree on the lawn of the United Bank in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Winds from Tropical Storm Irma uprooted a tree on the lawn of the United Bank in Griffin, Georgia.
Downed Trees
Tropical Storm Irma blew powerful winds of up to 70 mph when she hit Georgia, providing homeowners, tree removal services and insurance companies plenty of work to do. Examining storm-damaged trees can provide insight into why some trees "fail" during windstorms.
Displaced cattle seek higher ground during Hurricane Harvey in Brazoria County, Texas. Livestock will seek higher ground during flooding, but unfortunately, farmers can't relocate their crops. CAES News
Displaced cattle seek higher ground during Hurricane Harvey in Brazoria County, Texas. Livestock will seek higher ground during flooding, but unfortunately, farmers can't relocate their crops.
Prepare & Evacuate
If a mandatory evacuation is declared in your area, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Tim Davis says residents should prepare to be away from home for a few weeks.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Emergency Food
As hurricane season arrives, Georgians are listening closely to local weather broadcasts. Whether or not a record-breaking storm affects you, University of Georgia experts say having an emergency food supply on hand is always a good idea.