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Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County. CAES News
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County.
Pecan Dieback
Nearly a year after thousands of trees were destroyed by Hurricane Michael, Georgia pecan producers are reporting the dieback of pecan branches and leaf burning in trees that survived the October 2018 storm, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.
A student at New Mountain Hill Elementary School in Harris County practices counting pollinators in advance of the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, August 23-24. Georgians who want to join the count should sign up at the ggapc.org. CAES News
A student at New Mountain Hill Elementary School in Harris County practices counting pollinators in advance of the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, August 23-24. Georgians who want to join the count should sign up at the ggapc.org.
Pollinator Census
This August, more than 900 Georgians will make history by participating in the first citizen-powered census of pollinators in the United States.
Calvin Perry instructs 4-H campers during the annual 4-H20 camp at Stripling Irrigation Research Park in 2018. The park will host its field day on July 18. CAES News
Calvin Perry instructs 4-H campers during the annual 4-H20 camp at Stripling Irrigation Research Park in 2018. The park will host its field day on July 18.
Field Day
Water conservation is a part of the everyday work done at the University of Georgia’s Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP), where scientists are constantly developing innovative sustainable agricultural practices. Georgia farmers can see some of those methods firsthand on Thursday, July 18, during the park’s annual field day beginning at 8:30 a.m.
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) in honor of her career studying evolutionary biology and working to breed more resilient crop varieties. CAES News
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) in honor of her career studying evolutionary biology and working to breed more resilient crop varieties.
CSSA Fellow
Katrien M. Devos, a professor of crop and soil sciences and plant biology at the University of Georgia, has been named a Fellow of the Crop Science Society of America (CSSA).
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise. CAES News
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise.
Pollinator Census
In three months, an army of citizen scientists across the state will undertake a first-of-its-kind pollinator count across Georgia. To prepare for the Great Georgia Pollinator Census this August, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a few summer reading suggestions for citizen scientists of all ages.
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do. CAES News
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do.
Irrigation App
University of Georgia scientists have created a new app to help Georgia vegetable growers irrigate their crops more efficiently.
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia. CAES News
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia.
Forage Management
According to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest forage agronomist, an unusually wet winter will cause problems with summer forage crop quality in Georgia.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of the lack of rain over the past couple of weeks, peanut plants are likely to be irrigated this early in the growing season.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent. CAES News
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent.
Georgia Project WET
Along with the University of Georgia's C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park, the UGA Cooperative Extension 4-H program in Mitchell County has been named the 2019 Georgia Project WET Organization of the Year for hosting a Georgia 4-H camp designed to teach children the importance of water conservation.
Cotton is watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. Irrigation equipment needs to be serviced before the production season begins. CAES News
Cotton is watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. Irrigation equipment needs to be serviced before the production season begins.
Irrigation Maintenance
Irrigation systems are one the most essential components of a farmer’s toolbox. After sitting idle during the winter, now is the time farmers should check their systems before the spring growing season.