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Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses. CAES News
Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses.
COVID-19 Farm Safety
While there is no evidence that the COVID-19 virus is a food safety concern, it is a worker health concern as it spreads via close person-to-person contact or by contact with contaminated surfaces.
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. CAES News
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Takeout Safer
Buying takeout food is a good choice to lower risks of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Samantha Spellicy, a graduate student of the Stice lab at the University of Georgia, performs a lab test on the therapeutic activity of exosomes. CAES News
Samantha Spellicy, a graduate student of the Stice lab at the University of Georgia, performs a lab test on the therapeutic activity of exosomes.
Stroke Recovery
University of Georgia animal scientists, funded by the National Institutes of Health, have brain-imaging data for a new stroke treatment that supports full recovery in swine, modeled with the same pattern of neurodegeneration as seen in humans with severe stroke.
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology. With this potential new technique, RBC researchers, including Steve Stice (left) and Lohitash Karumbaiah (right), hope to boost the brain’s natural ability to recover and provide physicians with a treatment that can be administered immediately in cases of severe TBI. CAES News
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology. With this potential new technique, RBC researchers, including Steve Stice (left) and Lohitash Karumbaiah (right), hope to boost the brain’s natural ability to recover and provide physicians with a treatment that can be administered immediately in cases of severe TBI.
“Cargo” Molecules
A team of researchers from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that neural exosomes — “cargo” molecules within the nervous system that carry messages to the brain — can minimize or even avert progression of traumatic brain injury when used as part of a new cell-to-cell messaging technology.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, was held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, was held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018.
Rural Stress
Farmers are extended family for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents throughout the state, and agents are uniquely positioned to raise awareness about rural stress and mental health concerns for Georgia farmers.
D.W. Brooks Award of Excellence winners Marc van Iersel, Vincent J. Dooley Professor of Horticulture; Lori Purcell Bledsoe, Georgia 4-H program development coordinator for Northeast Georgia; and Alfredo Martinez-Espinoza, professor of plant pathology, are congratulated by CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Award of Excellence winners Marc van Iersel, Vincent J. Dooley Professor of Horticulture; Lori Purcell Bledsoe, Georgia 4-H program development coordinator for Northeast Georgia; and Alfredo Martinez-Espinoza, professor of plant pathology, are congratulated by CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue.
D.W. Brooks Lecture
The students and faculty of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences came together Nov. 12 to celebrate the progress that agriculture has made in the past 50 years and the promise of innovations to come.
Forty-six people presented posters at the RBC Symposium held Friday, April 26. RBC Symposium Judge Simon Platt, BVM&S, a UGA professor of veterinary neurology, is shown with RBC poster presenter Katherine Watkins of the Easley Lab. View more images at https://adobe.ly/2vBPsxf. CAES News
Forty-six people presented posters at the RBC Symposium held Friday, April 26. RBC Symposium Judge Simon Platt, BVM&S, a UGA professor of veterinary neurology, is shown with RBC poster presenter Katherine Watkins of the Easley Lab. View more images at https://adobe.ly/2vBPsxf.
Student Researchers
The 5th annual Regenerative Bioscience Center Fellows Symposium drew more than 54 student participants. The gathering generally focused around the center’s core research projects of stroke, neurological injury, and orthopedic conditions. The 2019 event, titled Climb Higher, included students in the CAES Animal and Dairy Science program.
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge. CAES News
UGArden intern Lily Dabbs, a second-year geography major working toward a certificate in urban and metropolitan studies, delivers the first crop of UGArden vegetables to Ava Parisi, UGA Student Food Pantry director and a student majoring in health promotion and behavioral medicine. Photo by Vince Selvidge.
UGArden Donations
Food insecurity is an issue among college students that is rarely discussed but all too common. With limited funds or inconsistent income streams, some college students may have to choose between paying rent and buying groceries.
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018. CAES News
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018.
Pathogens’ Defense
When humans get sick, our immune systems kick into high gear. To help guard against disease, people are increasingly turning to antimicrobial agents — from soaps to wipes to hand sanitizers — to help kill germs. However, scientists have found that some strains of Salmonella pathogens have developed strategies to evade damage.
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus. CAES News
Xiangyu Deng, an assistant professor of food microbiology with the Center for Food Safety (CFS) on the UGA Griffin campus.
Source ID
A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks.