Browse Weeds, Diseases and Pests Stories

366 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
Broccoli grown on the UGA Tifton Campus is pictured growing on wheat straw mulch, plastic mulch and on bare soil. CAES News
Broccoli grown on the UGA Tifton Campus is pictured growing on wheat straw mulch, plastic mulch and on bare soil.
Organic Weed Control
If they start now, Georgia organic farmers can use mulch and cultivation to manage young weeds, according to Juan Carlos Diaz-Perez, vegetable scientist on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. If weeds are not controlled successfully and are allowed to grow throughout May and June, they can compete with crops for nutrients, water and sunlight.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
This is an image of Vidalia onions at a farm stand in Tattnall County, Georgia. CAES News
This is an image of Vidalia onions at a farm stand in Tattnall County, Georgia.
Onion Storage
With Georgia’s Vidalia onion harvest approaching, growers must prepare to protect their crops from diseases during storage, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist.
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies. CAES News
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies.
Ant Queens
In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that’s not always the way ant societies function.
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year. CAES News
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year.
Citrus Crop
The citrus greening disease that has devastated Florida’s industry over the past decade is not affecting Georgia production, but growers should still be aware of the potential danger it can bring, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day. CAES News
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day.
PSO Awards
Eight University of Georgia faculty and staff were honored for exemplary service to the state during Monday’s 2019 Public Service and Outreach awards luncheon, which included awards for Entrepreneur of the Year and Donor Impact.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Pecan Pest
Ambrosia beetles are swarming south Georgia pecan orchards and farmers should take precautions now, according to Angel Acebes-Doria, pecan entomologist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood CAES News
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood
Spring Ant Control
Whether you have a well-manicured lawn or a wild preserve, almost every landscape in Georgia shares one feature: fire ants.
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects. CAES News
Professor and UGA Extension Entomologist Will Hudson projects images of a beneficial predator from his microscope during a presentation on beneficial insects.
Nature's Helpers
While the use of beneficial insects and other biocontrols for agricultural pest management hasn’t gained widespread usage in open field production, some Georgia farmers are using natural control methods in greenhouse and high-tunnel production.
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. Blueberry farmers are wary of a late season freeze and its impact on this year's crop. CAES News
Blueberries growing on the Alapaha farm in Alapaha, Georgia in this file photo. Blueberry farmers are wary of a late season freeze and its impact on this year's crop.
IPM Grant
The University of Georgia has been awarded a $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop organic methods of controlling the Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD).