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Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash. CAES News
Whiteflies transmit several devastating viruses to important vegetable crops, including squash.
Whitefly Management
Researchers from three research institutions are using a $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fight whiteflies on vegetable crops.
UGA mycologist Marin Brewer is using a recent USDA NIFA grant to continue her research of Aspergillus fumigatus, a fungus that is abundant in soil, compost and other organic debris. This fungus can cause serious lung infections in immunocompromised people. Michelle Momany, a professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, is collaborating with Brewer on this study. CAES News
UGA mycologist Marin Brewer is using a recent USDA NIFA grant to continue her research of Aspergillus fumigatus, a fungus that is abundant in soil, compost and other organic debris. This fungus can cause serious lung infections in immunocompromised people. Michelle Momany, a professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Plant Biology, is collaborating with Brewer on this study.
Fungal Research
University of Georgia mycologist Marin Brewer has been awarded close to $500,000 from the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to search for ways to detect antifungal resistance in a naturally occurring fungus and identify the factors that contribute to its resistance in agricultural environments.
Bermuda grass stem maggot damages the upper leaves of a forage crop. Lisa Baxter estimates about 60% yield loss in this picture. CAES News
Bermuda grass stem maggot damages the upper leaves of a forage crop. Lisa Baxter estimates about 60% yield loss in this picture.
Forage Pest Management
Drought-like conditions this summer are forcing Georgia forage farmers to delay treatments for Bermuda grass stem maggot, according to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension forage specialist.
A corn plot grows for research at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue managing their weeds even after corn is harvested this year. CAES News
A corn plot grows for research at the Sunbelt Ag Expo. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue managing their weeds even after corn is harvested this year.
Weed Control
Georgia corn farmers are preparing for harvest, but they can’t take a break once they ship their crops to market. That time should be focused on staying ahead of weeds that can cripple the next year’s crop.
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County. CAES News
Hurricane Michael's strong winds uprooted pecan trees in Tift County.
Pecan Dieback
Nearly a year after thousands of trees were destroyed by Hurricane Michael, Georgia pecan producers are reporting the dieback of pecan branches and leaf burning in trees that survived the October 2018 storm, according to Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist.
Pictured is an image of cotton suspected of suffering from symptoms of Cotton Blue Disease. CAES News
Pictured is an image of cotton suspected of suffering from symptoms of Cotton Blue Disease.
Cotton Virus
Scientists from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Scientists are investigating the epidemiology of cotton leaf roll dwarf virus (CLRDV) in Georgia using a $75,000 grant jointly funded by the Georgia Cotton Commission and Cotton Incorporated.
Broccoli grown on the UGA Tifton Campus is pictured growing on wheat straw mulch, plastic mulch and on bare soil. CAES News
Broccoli grown on the UGA Tifton Campus is pictured growing on wheat straw mulch, plastic mulch and on bare soil.
Organic Weed Control
If they start now, Georgia organic farmers can use mulch and cultivation to manage young weeds, according to Juan Carlos Diaz-Perez, vegetable scientist on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. If weeds are not controlled successfully and are allowed to grow throughout May and June, they can compete with crops for nutrients, water and sunlight.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
This is an image of Vidalia onions at a farm stand in Tattnall County, Georgia. CAES News
This is an image of Vidalia onions at a farm stand in Tattnall County, Georgia.
Onion Storage
With Georgia’s Vidalia onion harvest approaching, growers must prepare to protect their crops from diseases during storage, according to Tim Coolong, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist.
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies. CAES News
Kip Lacy, who is currently a graduate fellow at the Rockefeller University but received his master’s in entomology from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2018, worked with UGA fire ant researcher Ken Ross and DeWayne Shoemaker at the University of Tennessee to isolate and document the multi-queen colonies.
Ant Queens
In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that’s not always the way ant societies function.