Browse Blueberries Stories - Page 6

61 results found for Blueberries
Blueberries sit in baskets at the UGA organic research farm. Photo taken July 23, 2008 in Watkinsville, Ga. CAES News
Frozen blueberries?
With the recent warm winter weather, one of Georgia’s favorite crops, blueberries, could be at risk to freeze damage if a cold snap returns.
A young visitor to the UGA Pavilion at the 2011 Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Ga., Oct. 19 learns about giant cockroaches. CAES News
Expo weathers on
Despite an uncomfortable mix of wet, cold and windy weather, North America’s premier farm show, the Sunbelt Ag Expo, marched on this week in Moultrie, Ga. More than 70,000 visitors perused the wears of 1,200 vendors, a North Carolina farmer was tapped as the Southeast’s top and land-grant universities brought their messages to the masses.
Blueberries sit in baskets at the UGA organic research farm. Photo taken July 23, 2008 in Watkinsville, Ga. CAES News
Blueberries bountiful this season
It’s blueberry time in Georgia, and farmers expect a good season, says a University of Georgia blueberry expert.
CAES News
Weather shift
Georgia’s unusually cold winter means that two of Georgia’s most famously sweet crops are at risk later this winter or early spring.
Bacterial leaf scorch, caused by the bacterium Xyella fastidiosa, causes what looks like burns on the blueberry leaves. CAES News
Blueberry disease
Blueberries passed peaches as the state’s top moneymaking fruit a few years ago, worth more than $100 million on the farm annually. But new diseases threaten to hamper its rise, says a University of Georgia fruit specialist.
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter. CAES News
New berrry bred for home gardens
For years, University of Georgia plant breeder Scott NeSmith has created new blueberry varieties for the commercial market. Now, he has bred one just for home gardeners.
Homegrown tomatoes dried in a food dehydrator CAES News
Dried produce
If your home garden “runneth over” with produce, try drying the excess as a healthy snack or nutritional addition to winter soups and sauces. A University of Georgia food safety specialist says it only takes a dehydrator and a little effort.
"Your Southern Garden" host Walter Reeves. CAES News
Tasty Treats
Spring gardens are now full of beautiful blooms, or eye candy for gardeners. But gardens can offer bountiful taste treats, too. Honey, herbs, tomatoes and blueberries highlight a savory episode of “Your Southern Garden with Walter Reeves” April 17 at 12:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Georgia Public Broadcasting.
Peaches hang in a south Georgia orchard July 2009. This year's cold winter has benefitted the state's peach crop. CAES News
Chilled peaches, blueberries
Georgia’s recent abnormally cold weather has been good for its developing peach and blueberry crops. But a warm spell now could cause blooms to emerge too soon.
Blueberries sit in baskets at the UGA organic research farm. Photo taken July 23, 2008 in Watkinsville, Ga. CAES News
Rotten fuel
University of Georgia researcher Gary Hawkins looks at rotting fruits and vegetables differently than most people. Where they may see useless balls of moldy fuzz, he sees fuel.