Browse Grapes Stories - Page 2

25 results found for Grapes
Texas-based viticulture consultant Fritz Westover, Carroll County Master Gardener Laura Davis, and staff members from the UGA Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Laboratories in Athens, Georgia, harvest grapes at Trillium Vineyards in Haralson County. CAES News
New to Grapes?
Georgia’s growing wine industry has an annual impact of more than $7 million on Georgia’s economy, but new growers may have difficulty knowing whether the vineyard business makes sense for them.
Georgia's Southern Piedmont grape farmers are finding success with hybrid varieties popularized in Texas wine country, like these Lenoir grapes grown in Haralson County. CAES News
Georgia's Grape Industry
Georgia’s grape industry, once dormant, is now thriving, according to Phillip Brannen, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit plant pathologist. Growing potential for prosperity in the wine industry will require that farmers stay vigilant about certain diseases, like Pierce’s disease, that could negatively impact production.
On March 1, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will welcome Cain Hickey, the state's first full-time Extension viticulturist. CAES News
Extension Viticulturist
Wine is becoming a big business in Georgia, and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is working to support this growing sector of the economy by providing new expertise for wine growers.
Jordan Burbage, of the UGA Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Laboratory in Athens, Georgia, harvests grapes at Trillium Vineyards, part of the collaborative research project being conducted by UGA Extension and Westover Vineyard Consulting. CAES News
Grape Harvest
Fall may be known as harvest time for peanuts, cotton and apples in Georgia, but the state’s winemakers would like Georgians to start thinking about grapes when the leaves start to transition to red and orange.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Amanda Wilbanks, owner of Southern Baked Pie Company in Gainesville, accepts her University of Georgia Flavor of Georgia grand prize trophy from Gov. Nathan Deal, UGA College of Agricultural and and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue and Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black Tuesday March 15. CAES News
2016 Flavor of Georgia Winners
Amanda Wilbanks, owner of Gainseville’s Southern Baked Pie Company, baked her way to the grand prize with her caramel pecan pie in the University of Georgia’s 2016 Flavor of Georgia Contest.
Samples of Blanc du Bois wine grapes from Trillium Vineyards. CAES News
Georgia Wine
Georgia wines may not have the same cachet as California chardonnays or French Burgundies, but they’re earning new accolades each year thanks to a community of dedicated grape growers and little help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
Brad K Hounkpati is shown in his UGA office with images of his lady bug collection shown on his computer screen. CAES News
International Graduate Research
In 2015, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) expanded a program that funds graduate student research travel, with remarkable results.
University of Georgia Extension specialists say rinse fruits and vegetables well in running water that is safe for drinking before using them. Fruits and vegetables with firm skins or hard rinds can be washed by scrubbing with a clean vegetable brush under running water. CAES News
Safe Harvest
Keeping produce safe means keeping harmful bacteria, viruses and parasites from contaminating fruits and vegetables. Enjoy the rewards of growing food through planning and some practical food safety tips.