Browse Ornamental Horticulture Stories - Page 4

94 results found for Ornamental Horticulture
The golden-colored 'Caramel' and rust-colored 'Lava Lamp' are two hybrids of Heuchera villosa growing in the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah. CAES News
Coral Bells
Coral bells deserve a place in the sun, partial shade or shade. Plant them along woodland trails, in front of shrubs or partner them with wood fern or autumn fern or even hostas. Gardeners in the South must try them as a sunny, cool-season component plant.
Lamiums reach a height of 8 to 12 inches with a spread of 24 inches, making them a perfect spiller plant in mixed containers. CAES News
Deadnettle's Not Dead
January is typically a self-induced holding pattern when it comes to gardening. But if you find that you failed to get cool-season containers planted, then take advantage of fresh shipments of pansies, violas, petunias, dianthus and all the other component plants, like lamiums, as they arrive at your garden center.
Bright Lights Swiss chard is like a beet without a bottom. CAES News
Swiss Chard
There's a lot to love about Swiss chard. It is highly ornamental and wonderfully edible.
The red misplaced sage (Salvia disjuncta) and Copper Canyon daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) create a wonderful fall combination in the landscape. CAES News
Fall-blooming Salvias
Salvias are deer-resistant perennials that create excitement in the garden by virtue of their spiky blooms. They also attract hummingbirds and pollinators.
Calibrachoa 'Cabaret® Lemon Yellow' was a crowd favorite at the public open house before being selected as a Classic City Garden Award winner. It was quick to grow into a mound of deep green foliage that became covered in deep lemon-yellow flowers. This plant remained in full bloom all summer. CAES News
Classic City Awards
Every summer, the staff of the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia raises hundreds of varieties of new ornamentals, and the best of those plants become Classic City Garden Award winners.
University of Georgia horticulturist Carol Robacker has released 'Raspberry Profusion,' a cultivar that blooms heavily from May to September. Its raspberry-colored sepals, wonderful fragrance and foliage is more spectacular than older varieties. CAES News
Foundation Plants
What makes a good foundation plant for your home landscape? Any plant that can tolerate extreme heat, highly compact soil and a highly alkaline soil pH is a good candidate.
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane. CAES News
Storm Damage
When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.
Ornamentals, like native azalea 'Rosy Cheeks,' perform well when planted in the fall. The key is to follow proper planting techniques. This includes digging the planting hole twice as big as the plant's rootball and breaking up the rootball before planting. CAES News
Fall Ornamentals
Fall has arrived! As the summer heat begins to subside, fall becomes an ideal time to plant woody ornamentals. Following proper planting procedures is essential or problems will arise later.
Everillo's grassy texture combines well with flowers like SunPatiens. CAES News
Perfect Companion
There seems to be no plant combination that is not made better by partnering with ‘Everillo,' commonly known as "Japanese sedge." It's an incredible companion with hostas, ferns, pansies and tulips.
Ruby-throated hummingbirds love 'Lime Sizzler' firebush. CAES News
'Lime Sizzler'
Ever since firebush was declared a Texas Superstar winner 20 years ago, it has captured the fancy of gardeners, hummingbirds, butterflies and bees. Now with the addition of 'Lime Sizzler,' gardeners have gone gaga.