Browse Peaches Stories - Page 2

47 results found for Peaches
Peaches hang from a Georgia tree in this 2009 file photo. CAES News
Peach Crop
Georgia’s peach crop may suffer this year due to insufficient chill hours, which are essential to peach production, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Taylor and Peach counties.
CAES News
Ag Tour
From watching how a peach is picked, packaged and delivered, to learning how federal and state regulators ensure that only the highest quality produce is shipped from Georgia, the fourth annual state agriculture tour covered a wide range of agricultural topics.
GM crops chart CAES News
GMO Safety
Genetically modified foods are tested for safety testing before they reach the marketplace. It can take over a decade and cost tens of millions of dollars, and as a result, GMOs are the most safety-tested foods in history, says University of Georgia plant breeding and plant genetics expert Wayne Parrott.
Beginning farmer training through the UGA Cooperative Extension Journeyman Farmer Certificate Program starts in August. CAES News
Beginning Farmers Training
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is set to offer a second year of the Journeyman Farmer training for beginning and young farmers this August.
On the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia, UGA doctoral student Bruno Casamali is testing different irrigation methods and fertilization rates to give Georgia growers advice on how to grow peaches more efficiently. CAES News
Peach Research
Two years into the job, University of Georgia peach specialist Dario Chavez is pleased with the development of his research program. The new research peach orchard in Griffin, Georgia, is filled with over 130 different peach tree varieties, several newly grafted potential varieties and a host of trees for irrigation and fertilization studies, all in an effort to help growers of the crop that gave Georgia its nickname — the “Peach State.”
Harald Scherm, professor of plant pathology and assistant dean for research at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will take over as department head for plant pathology on July 1, 2016. CAES News
Plant Pathology Head
After nearly two decades helping farmers combat the diseases affecting Georgia’s most prominent fruit crops, Professor Harald Scherm has been appointed head of the University of Georgia’s Department of Plant Pathology following a national search.
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter. CAES News
Edible Landscaping
The key to creating a visually appealing edible landscape is the artful combination of annuals and perennials. Most edible plants can act as substitutes for annual plants, but there are some options that can substitute for shrubs, vines and small trees.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.
Here is a picture of a  peach tree orchard. CAES News
Peach Pest Management
University of Georgia plant pathologist Phil Brannen is concerned that Georgia peach growers can’t tell the difference between phony peach disease and weevil or nematode damage. A consequence could be that farmers unnecessarily destroy trees and potential fruit.