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47 results found for Peaches
Here's a closeup picture of blueberries being grown in Alapaha. Picture taken in May, 2013. CAES News
Warm Winter Blues
After ending 2015 with some record-breaking warm and wet weather, Georgia’s fruit and tree nut farmers are concerned that the lack of chill hours and soggy soil could damage their crops.
December 2015 was much warmer than normal across the southeastern United States. CAES News
December 2015
2015 saw one of the warmest Decembers since Georgians started keeping records, and the month was also much wetter than normal. The warm, wet conditions created havoc for Georgia farmers.
UGA peanut geneticist Peggy Ozias-Akins, director of the UGA Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics, examines a peanut blossom. Ozias-Akin's lab on the UGA Tifton Campus focuses on female reproduction and gene transfer in plants. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Awards
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will recognize nine of its finest next month with the D.W. Brooks Awards for Excellence and the CAES Faculty and Staff Support Awards.
Two steers graze on sorghum/sudangrass hybrid forage at the UGA Eatonton Beef Research Unit as part of a 2014 study on grass-finished beef forages. CAES News
Farmgate Value Report
Led by increases in forestry and livestock values, Georgia’s agricultural output increased by $484 million in 2014, making agriculture, once again, the largest industry in the state with a value of $14.1 billion. According to the most recent University of Georgia Farmgate Value Report, published earlier this month, the value of Georgia’s livestock and aquaculture industries increased by almost 36 percent from 2013.
University of Georgia Extension specialists say rinse fruits and vegetables well in running water that is safe for drinking before using them. Fruits and vegetables with firm skins or hard rinds can be washed by scrubbing with a clean vegetable brush under running water. CAES News
Safe Harvest
Keeping produce safe means keeping harmful bacteria, viruses and parasites from contaminating fruits and vegetables. Enjoy the rewards of growing food through planning and some practical food safety tips.
Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black examines a pumpkin field at Jaemor Farms with farm manager Drew Echols, Rep. Terry England, UGA President Jere Morehead, CAES Dean J. Scott Angle and other officials during the UGA President's Third Annual Farm Tour. CAES News
UGA President's Farm Tour
From vineyards and vegetable patches to state-of-the-art food processing and food safety operations, agriculture in northeast Georgia is made up of a large and diverse set of enterprises.
CAES News
Faculty Travel Grants
In an effort to increase international collaboration on research and outreach projects, the Office of Global Programs at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has awarded its 2015 international travel grants for college faculty.
Peaches hang in a south Georgia orchard July 2009. This year's cold winter has benefitted the state's peach crop. CAES News
Peach Research
The late-March cold spell caused some Georgia peach growers to lose a portion of their crop, but consumers should see a typical selection of fruit when the first Georgia-grown varieties ripen this month, said University of Georgia scientist Dario Chavez.
UGA Extension consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield checks bean plants for signs of disease and insects on the UGA campus in Griffin. Westerfield grows vegetables at work to be prepared to answer home gardener questions. He grows them at home for his dinner table. CAES News
Starting Small
Backyard gardeners thinking of turning their hobby into a business should start small, according to University of Georgia consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield.
Ross Oglesby works on a seal for the Sunbelt Expo Spotlight State Building. CAES News
Sunbelt Seals
A graduate of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is etched into Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition history.