Browse Pecans Stories - Page 3

75 results found for Pecans
Lenny Wells conducts a pecan pruning clinic in Wilcox County on Jan. 31, 2018. CAES News
Pecan Pruning
Pruning young pecan trees is a necessity and, if done properly, can save farmers the hassle of pruning older, much larger trees, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Pecans on the ground on the UGA Tifton Campus in this 2013 photo. CAES News
Georgia Pecan Crop
Hurricane Irma, downgraded to a tropical storm when it entered the state, damaged about 30 percent of Georgia’s pecan crop, and the storm’s effects could linger into next growing season, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Harvest
Tropical Storm Irma broke pecan tree limbs, knocked trees down and blew nuts off the trees and out of their shucks when it moved through Georgia in early September, yet University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells is still optimistic about this year’s crop. He estimates yields ranging from 85 to 100 million pounds.
Crimson clover and rye grow together to form a cover crop in a research plot on the University of Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Georgia. CAES News
Pecan Cover Crops
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells recommends planting crimson clover, or a similar cover crop, in pecan orchards to supply much-needed nitrogen and build up organic matter in the soil.
Group of truffles. CAES News
Truffles
University of Georgia plant pathologist Tim Brenneman has studied the viability of truffles in the state’s pecan orchards for years. This winter, he will advance his research by introducing the European variety of truffles to Georgia pecan trees.
A limb broke off of a pecan tree in Tift County, Georgia, during Tropical Storm Irma. CAES News
Georgia Pecan Crop
Irma’s destructive path blew through Georgia’s pecan crop, but the destruction could have been much worse, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Crop
The Southeast is in Hurricane Irma’s crosshairs, and Georgia pecan farmers are bracing for the hurricane’s potential impact on this year’s crop.
Pecans being researched on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Pecan Field Day
Georgia is closing in on the last few weeks of the 2017 pecan growing season, a make-or-break time for the crop and its associated profits.
Cover of Lenny Wells' book about pecans. CAES News
Pecan Book
Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist and the university’s leading voice in the pecan industry, covers the history of pecans and their popularity in the South in his first book, “Pecan: America’s Native Nut Tree.”
UGA's newest pecan variety, ‘Avalon’, in 2017. The pecan's extreme resistance to scab disease makes it desirable for pecan farmers looking to replenish their crop after Hurricane Michael. CAES News
Avalon Variety
Growers who are anxious to buy large quantities of the newest pecan cultivar, ‘Avalon,’ will likely be disappointed as supplies are low, according to University of Georgia pecan breeder Patrick Conner. The new UGA-bred cultivar will be released this spring.