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Pecans are harvested Oct. 1 in Crisp County, Ga. This year is an 'on' year for Georgia, where 90 million pounds to 100 million pounds will be harvested. The poundage is no record, but the prices are, bringing as much as $3 or more per pound for growers. This could push the crop's value to more than $300 million, or $100 million more than in any year prior. CAES News
Valuable nut
Georgia is the No. 1 pecan-producing state in the country, and growers there are harvesting what could be the most valuable pecan crop in its history.
A young visitor to the UGA Pavilion at the 2011 Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Ga., Oct. 19 learns about giant cockroaches. CAES News
Expo weathers on
Despite an uncomfortable mix of wet, cold and windy weather, North America’s premier farm show, the Sunbelt Ag Expo, marched on this week in Moultrie, Ga. More than 70,000 visitors perused the wears of 1,200 vendors, a North Carolina farmer was tapped as the Southeast’s top and land-grant universities brought their messages to the masses.
Green pecans grow on a tree in South Georgia. CAES News
Dry orchards
Drought continues to suppress Georgia agriculture, particularly in southwest Georgia, the hub of the state’s pecan production. It could turn what was expected to be an “on” year into an “off” one for pecan growers.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath a pecan tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.  Photo taken November 2009. CAES News
Pricey pecans
Summertime drought hurt Georgia’s pecan crop, and now harvest is behind schedule. But there is one big bright spot: Pecan prices are currently the highest they have ever been, according to a University of Georgia pecan specialist.
Most Georgia farmers plant more than one crop during a season, usually managing a combination of peanuts, cotton, corn or soybeans. Across the board, they are looking at record or record-tying yields in 2009. CAES News
Georgia crops
Georgia’s tobacco and pecan crop are on pace for a surprisingly good year. Not surprisingly, though, above-normal temperatures have smothered the state and taken a toll on some row crops, like peanut and cotton.
An early-maturing pecan variety called Pawnee is harvested in an orchard in Crisp County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans 'on'
A pecan-loving disease enjoyed Georgia’s wet summer weather and is now blamed for cutting what was expected to be a large crop, says a University of Georgia pecan specialist. But farmers still expect to have an “on” year.
Irrigation system working in a field. CAES News
Farm-water forecast
A recent University of Georgia report shows that Georgia farmers will need 20 percent more water to grow their crops in the next four decades. They’ll need it to meet increased food demand and to compete globally.