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41 results found for Tomatoes
Thrips are tiny winged insects that feed chiefly on plants. Many species damage cultivated plants, by either sucking the sap or transmitting viral plant diseases. Thrips reach a maximum length of about half an inch. Most have two pairs of long, narrow, hair-fringed wings. CAES News
Thrips Damage
A tiny insect proved to be a formidable foe for Georgia farmers in 2013. Whether thrips will deliver a similar punch in 2014 remains to be seen. There are more than 7,000 species of thrips, but only two cause problems for Georgia farmers and UGA researchers — tobacco thrips and western flower thrips.
A cucumber vine grows in a backyard garden in Butts County, Ga. CAES News
Perfect for diseases
Summer is a great time for fresh local produce, but Georgia summers can present many challenges for gardeners trying to keep crops healthy and alive. This is especially true for tomatoes and cucurbits.
Tomato cages keep plants secure in a garden in Albany, Ga. CAES News
Late Season Tomatoes
Home gardeners who want to add more tomato plants to their garden, may want to consider growing transplants from suckers.
Glyphosate damage on tomato. CAES News
Herbicide Transfer
After fielding a number of calls and examining plant samples brought in to the Bartow County Extension Office, I have decided vegetable gardeners are probably better off not using hay or manure in their gardens.
University of Georgia Entomologist Rajagopalbabu Srinivasan examines a tomato plant on a plot on the Tifton campus. CAES News
Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl
Tomato yellow leaf curl virus has been a chronic threat to tomato production in South Georgia for more than a decade. The problem is only getting worse.
Corn tassels stretch toward the sun in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Garden rows
As a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent, I answer hundreds of gardening question. This week, a gardener wanted to know how far apart to space her garden rows. The short answer is: it depends.
A variety of tomatoes for sale at the Buford Highway Farmers Market in Atlanta. CAES News
Tomato tips
Whether or not you are trying to grow tomatoes for the first time, or this is your 30th season, here are some tips to follow from the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to make sure your harvest is plentiful.
Farmers and members of the general public met in Macon on March 20 to view a listening session in Atlanta on the proposed new food safety act. Lee Lancaster, senior compliance specialist with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, is shown explaining how to submit comments to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. CAES News
Food safety act
Concerned Georgia farmers gathered in Atlanta, Macon and Tifton on Wednesday, March 20 to hear a summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s new Food Safety Modernization Act. Proposed by Congress, the act was developed in an effort to improve the safety of the nation’s food supply.
Green tomatoes infected with Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus. CAES News
Fighting TSWV
Once a major threat to the tomato industry, the thrips-vectored tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has been unable to penetrate the vegetable’s latest line of defense — resistant cultivars.
Bidens growing at the Unversity of Georgia campus in Tifton as part of a SARE trail researching cover crops as beneficial companion plants. CAES News
Detering tomato spotted wilt virus
U.S. Department of Agriculture-sponsored research at the University of Georgia campus in Tifton is looking into the potential of using a cover crop system to improve soil and prevent tomato spotted wilt virus.