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126 results found for Turfgrass
More than a century of research at UGA underpins the field of plant pathology and pieces together the complex relationship between microbes and plants. CAES News
Plant Pathology
For more than a century, generations of researchers in the University of Georgia's Department of Plant Pathology have been at the leading edge of knowledge and innovation. As these researchers pass down their knowledge, their foundational scientific exploration helps safeguard crops, advance agricultural practices and ensure food security, not only in Georgia but far beyond its borders.
University of Georgia Athletic Association Endowed Professor Gerald Henry leads a research team in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences committed to creating sports fields that can limit the occurrence of injuries for the athletes playing on them. (Photo by Jason Thrasher) CAES News
Gerald Henry
When the two-time reigning national champion Georgia Bulldogs step between the hedges at Sanford Stadium this fall, Dooley Field needs to look the part. More importantly, though, it needs to help safeguard the health of athletes who compete on it. Gerald Henry plays a big role in the latter.
Resized Estadio BBVA4 copy CAES News
International Turfgrass Support
The University of Georgia’s turf program is supported by a group of faculty and research scientists throughout the state dedicated to year-round turfgrass research and outreach efforts. Members of the UGA Turf Team were recently invited to develop a training and certification program to support the field managers of Mexico’s premier soccer leagues — Liga MX, the top professional men’s soccer division, and Liga MX Femenil, the country’s top women’s soccer division.
Scott Chatham, owner and president of Chatham Landscape (fourth from left) recently brought his management team to UGA-Griffin for a tour and training of the irrigation demonstration site, located on the Griffin campus. The group met with Rolando Orellana (third from right), the brainchild behind the site, and his colleagues to learn more about the proper installation and use of irrigation in landscaping. CAES News
Irrigation Demonstration
The University of Georgia Griffin campus hosted its first training for a landscape company, Chatham Landscape, at its new irrigation demonstration site in April. Chatham Landscape is a sponsor of the site designed for training, research and education in new irrigation technologies.
Fall armyworm larvae have a white inverted Y-shaped mark on the front of their dark head. They are smooth skinned and vary in color from light tan or green to nearly black, with three yellowish-white hairlines down the back. The larval stage lasts from three to four weeks and can be damaging to turfgrass and crops. (Photo by USDA Agricultural Research Service Photo Unit, Bugwood.org) CAES News
Fall armyworms
Over the past couple of weeks, I have received numerous calls from curious homeowners and frustrated farmers regarding the dreaded fall armyworm. Damage to established turf is most often aesthetic. However, newly planted sod or sprigs can be severely damaged or even killed by fall armyworm feeding.
Clint Waltz, UGA Extension turfgrass specialist, welcomes the crowd to the 2022 Turfgrass Research Field Day at UGA-Griffin on Aug. 3. Interim Assistant Provost and Campus Director David Buntin (back) and Griffin Mayor Doug Hollberg (front) also welcomed the crowd of approximately 700 attendees to the event. CAES News
2022 Turfgrass Research Field Day
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Team welcomed approximately 700 people — including turf industry professionals, golf course superintendents and local homeowners — to the UGA Griffin campus for the 2022 Turfgrass Research Field Day earlier this month.
Newly named University of Georgia turfgrass researcher David Jespersen was among the UGA experts who presented their research findings at the Turfgrass Research Field Day on Thursday, Aug. 4. Jespersen is shown sharing the results of a UGA research project that evaluated the drought tolerance of four turfgrass species. CAES News
2022 Turfgrass Field Day
Whether you're a golf course superintendent or a homeowner looking to grow the perfect lawn, there will be something for you at this year’s University of Georgia Turfgrass Field Day. “After four long years we are excited to bring back the UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day,” said UGA Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist Clint Waltz.
Sod prices, such as for bermudagrasses like those developed by UGA turfgrass breeders, are higher this year for homeowners and industry. CAES News
Sod Prices Up
Low inventory of some varieties, combined with economic pressures exacerbated by supply chain and global issues, are pushing up the price of a meticulously manicured lawn this spring.
The new 22,000-square-foot soccer field allows UGA-Griffin faculty and students to perform research and Extension activities, as well as hands-on learning. Additionally, the field is used by the campus and local community several times a week for pick-up games. CAES News
Griffin Turf Partnerships
Any time you walk through a park, play a recreation-league soccer game or enjoy an afternoon on the golf course, you are using the products of the multibillion-dollar turfgrass industry. In Georgia alone, turfgrass covers 1.8 million acres, making it one of the largest agricultural commodities in the state, employing more than 100,000 people with a maintenance value of $1.56 billion.
CAES researchers Mussie Habteselassie, Bochra Bahri and David Jespersen are testing the benefits of using nanobubble-infused irrigation water to more efficiently grow sods and maintain turfgrass. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
Tiny Bubbles
While the old song “Tiny Bubbles” lauds the happy effervescence of a glass of sparkling wine, new University of Georgia research on nanobubbles seeks to discover whether the tiniest of bubbles can hold beneficial properties for turfgrass.